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Monday, July 7, 2014

Events are held in July during NAIDOC week, or the National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee, to celebrate Indigenous culture and achievements in Australia. The committee was established in the 1920s to increase awareness of the status and treatment of Aboriginal people.

 

Friday, July 4, 2014

Events are held in July during NAIDOC week, or the National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee, to celebrate Indigenous culture and achievements in Australia. The committee was established in the 1920s to increase awareness of the status and treatment of Aboriginal people.

 

 

Thursday, July 3, 2014

During this week in 1924, Mitchell Red Cloud, Jr. was born. The Army corporal was killed while holding off a night attack during the Korean War, which earned him a posthumous Medal of Honor.  The Army’s Camp Red Cloud in South Korea is named after him.  The Ho-Chunk man has also received many other recognitions including monuments, parks, highways and ships, which bear his name.  Red Cloud was also a veteran of World War II.  He served in the Marine Corps.

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

During this week in 1924, Mitchell Red Cloud, Jr. was born. The Army corporal was killed while holding off a night attack during the Korean War, which earned him a posthumous Medal of Honor.  The Army’s Camp Red Cloud in South Korea is named after him.  The Ho-Chunk man has also received many other recognitions including monuments, parks, highways and ships, which bear his name.  Red Cloud was also a veteran of World War II.  He served in the Marine Corps.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

On this day in 1955, the federal program for Indian health services was transferred to the Public Health Service, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare as the agency responsible for the country's human resources. The program was first under the War Department and then the Interior Department.

 

 

Monday, June 30, 2014

In June 2013, the Obama administration announced the establishment of the White House Council on Native American Affairs to ensure the government engages in the government-to-government relationship with federally recognized tribes.

 

 

Friday, June 27, 2014

In June 2012, the governor of Maine issued a proclamation to recognize Native American veterans and to remember in June 1775 when the Penobscot and other tribes agreed to fight with the Continental Army.

 

Thursday, June 26, 2014

In June 1906, Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado was established to protect archeological sites including cliff dwellings.

 

 

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

On this day in 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the case Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl, known as Baby Veronica. The court examined a custody dispute between the biological father, Dusten Brown, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, and a South Carolina couple, which the girl's mother chose for a planned adoption. The high court sent the case back to lower courts to decide Veronica's placement. The Indian Child Welfare Act, intended to keep Native families together, was used in the case. Tribes, advocates and Native organizations closely followed proceedings raising concerns about potential impacts in Indian Country. The girl was eventually handed over to the couple, Matt and Melanie Capobianco, and Brown dropped the legal fight.

 

 

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Today we remember a Lakota code talker who passed away in June 2010. Clarence Wolf Guts was one of a handful of Native American code talkers from South Dakota to serve during World War II. He was buried with full military honors at Black Hills National Cemetery.

 

 

Monday, June 23, 2014

During this month in 1972, the Indian Education Act was signed into law. The legislation addressed needs of American Indian and Alaska Native students. It included additional funding....and created the Office of Indian Education, which is now the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE).

 

 

Friday, June 20, 2014

During this month in 1972, the Indian Education Act was signed into law. The legislation addressed needs of American Indian and Alaska Native students. It included additional funding....and created the Office of Indian Education, which is now the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE).

 

 

Thursday, June 19, 2014

During this month in 1984, the US Senate on Indian Affairs became a permanent committee.

 

 

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

During this week in 1948, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled in the case Harrison v. Laveen, which gave Native Americans in the state the right to vote.

 

 

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

In June 2012, Google and dozens of organizations launched an endangered languages website to help with revitalization efforts.

 

 

Monday, June 16, 2014

Canadians observe National Aboriginal Day in June to celebrate First Nations, Inuit and Metis people.

 

 

Friday, June 13, 2014

In June 2008, First Nations people across Canada watched and listened to the prime minister apologize for the abuses students suffered at Indian Residential Schools from the late 1800s to the 1970s.  Many students were physically, sexually and emotionally abused at the church-run, government funded schools.

 

 

Thursday, June 12, 2014

In June, King Kamehameha is honored in Hawaii. Celebrations take place to remember the chief who united the Hawaiian Islands in 1795.

 

 

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

In June 2009, Navajo Attorney Hilary Tompkins was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve as Solicitor of the Interior Department

 

 

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

During this month in 2007, Oklahoma tribal leaders watched President George W. Bush sign a bill in Washington, D.C. to reauthorize the Native American Home Ownership Opportunity Act. It encouraged homeownership among Native people by guaranteeing mortgages.

 

Monday, June 9, 2014

During this week in 1996, the historic Cobell Indian trust class-action lawsuit was filed.  The lawsuit against the federal government for the mismanagement of individual Indian trust accounts was settled for 3.4 billion dollars more than a decade later. Plaintiffs across the country are waiting for their settlement checks.  Many have expressed frustration about the delay.

 

 

 

ARCHIVES

While we look to each day’s events for our news coverage, we are aware of the unique relationship between Native histories and current events in Indian Country. We know that these histories are often misunderstood, misrepresented and even ignored. To bring a broader perspective to contemporary Native issues, we began to include one brief historical fact at the top of each newscast. These items will include significant and compelling bits of Native history.

Today in History ARCHIVES
Understanding the Present by Honoring our Past began November 1, 2002

History Archives 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007,
2008, 2009, 2010, 2011

JANUARY
/ FEBRUARY / MARCH
/ APRIL / MAY / JUNE / JULY / AUGUST / SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER / NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

 

Monday, July 7, 2014

Events are held in July during NAIDOC week, or the National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee, to celebrate Indigenous culture and achievements in Australia. The committee was established in the 1920s to increase awareness of the status and treatment of Aboriginal people.

 

Friday, July 4, 2014

Events are held in July during NAIDOC week, or the National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee, to celebrate Indigenous culture and achievements in Australia. The committee was established in the 1920s to increase awareness of the status and treatment of Aboriginal people.

 

 

Thursday, July 3, 2014

In July 1979, Jay Silverheels had a star with his named on it placed on Hollywood's Walk of Fame in California. The Native actor played Tonto in The Lone Ranger television series.

 

 

Wendesday, July 2, 2014

In July 1979, Jay Silverheels had a star with his named on it placed on Hollywood's Walk of Fame in California. The Native actor played Tonto in The Lone Ranger television series.

 

 

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

On this day in 1955, the federal program for Indian health services was transferred to the Public Health Service, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare as the agency responsible for the country's human resources. The program was first under the War Department and then the Interior Department.

 

 

Monday, June 30, 2014

In June 2013, the Obama administration announced the establishment of the White House Council on Native American Affairs to ensure the government engages in the government-to-government relationship with federally recognized tribes.

 

 

Friday, June 27, 2014

In June 2012, the governor of Maine issued a proclamation to recognize Native American veterans and to remember in June 1775 when the Penobscot and other tribes agreed to fight with the Continental Army.

 

 

Thursday, June 26, 2014

In June 1906, Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado was established to protect archeological sites including cliff dwellings.

 

 

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

On this day in 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the case Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl, known as Baby Veronica. The court examined a custody dispute between the biological father, Dusten Brown, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, and a South Carolina couple, which the girl's mother chose for a planned adoption. The high court sent the case back to lower courts to decide Veronica's placement. The Indian Child Welfare Act, intended to keep Native families together, was used in the case. Tribes, advocates and Native organizations closely followed proceedings raising concerns about potential impacts in Indian Country. The girl was eventually handed over to the couple, Matt and Melanie Capobianco, and Brown dropped the legal fight.

 

 

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Today we remember a Lakota code talker who passed away in June 2010. Clarence Wolf Guts was one of a handful of Native American code talkers from South Dakota to serve during World War II. He was buried with full military honors at Black Hills National Cemetery.

 

 

Monday, June 23, 2014

During this week in 2013, Felix Diaz, an Indigenous leader in Argentina, met with Catholic Pope Francis. He addressed issues like land rights and education.

 

 

Friday, June 20, 2014

During this month in 1972, the Indian Education Act was signed into law. The legislation addressed needs of American Indian and Alaska Native students. It included additional funding....and created the Office of Indian Education, which is now the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE).

 

 

Thursday, June 19, 2014

During this month in 1984, the US Senate on Indian Affairs became a permanent committee.

 

 

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

During this week in 1948, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled in the case Harrison v. Laveen, which gave Native Americans in the state the right to vote.

 

 

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

In June 2012, Google and dozens of organizations launched an endangered languages website to help with revitalization efforts.

 

 

Monday, June 16, 2014

Canadians observe National Aboriginal Day in June to celebrate First Nations, Inuit and Metis people.

 

 

Friday, June 13, 2014

In June 2008, First Nations people across Canada watched and listened to the prime minister apologize for the abuses students suffered at Indian Residential Schools from the late 1800s to the 1970s. Many students were physically, sexually and emotionally abused at the church-run, government funded schools.

 

 

Thursday, June 12, 2014

In June, King Kamehameha is honored in Hawaii. Celebrations take place to remember the chief who united the Hawaiian Islands in 1795.

 

 

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

In June 2009, Navajo Attorney Hilary Tompkins was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve as Solicitor of the Interior Department.

 

 

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

During this month in 2007, Oklahoma tribal leaders watched President George W. Bush sign a bill in Washington, D.C. to reauthorize the Native American Home Ownership Opportunity Act. It encouraged homeownership among Native people by guaranteeing mortgages.

 

 

Monday, June 9, 2014

During this week in 1996, the historic Cobell Indian trust class-action lawsuit was filed. The lawsuit against the federal government for the mismanagement of individual Indian trust accounts was settled for 3.4 billion dollars more than a decade later. Plaintiffs across the country are waiting for their settlement checks. Many have expressed frustration about the delay.

 

 

Friday, June 6, 2014

In June 1990, Petroglyph National Monument was established in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The protected area includes petroglyphs featuring images carved on rocks by Indigenous people hundreds of years ago.

 

 

Thursday, June 5, 2014

In June 2011, the Native American squash blossom became the official necklace of New Mexico. The design resembles the flower of the squash plant and is often made from silver with turquoise or other gemstones.

 

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

In June 2004, Erma Vizenor was elected chair of the White Earth Nation. Shes the first woman leader of the tribe, the largest tribe in Minnesota.

 

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

In June 1924, Congress extended American citizenship to all American Indians born in the U.S. with the Indian Citizenship Act. Native people had previously received citizenship through marriage, military service and land allotments. It was also granted to some tribes during treaty making.

 

Monday, June 2, 2014

In June 2004, Marcella LeBeau received the French Legion of Honor. The Lakota woman was one of 100 veterans awarded in Paris during the 60th anniversary commemorating the invasion of Normandy. LeBeau served as a nurse during World War II as a first lieutenant in the Army Nurse Corps.

 

Friday, May 30, 2014

During this month in 1993, the Alaska Native Justice Center was established. The center was created to serve the unmet needs of Alaska Native people in the civil and criminal justice systems.

 

Thursday, May 29, 2014

In May 1996, President Bill Clinton issued an executive order involving sacred sites. It required federal agencies to accommodate access to sacred sites and allow Native Americans ceremonial use of the land. It also pledged to protect sacred areas.

 

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

In May 2005, ABCs Extreme Makeover-Home Edition featured a new home built for the family of soldier Lori Piestewa. The Hopi woman was killed in Iraq in 2003 and is believed to be the first Native American woman to die in a foreign war. Former POW and friend Jessica Lynch nominated the family for the television show saying Piestewas dream was to return to Arizona and build her parents a home. The design team constructed a more than 4,000-square-foot house for the family in Flagstaff.

 

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

In May 1916, the second Saturday was designated as American Indian Day in New York. The states governor set aside the day for the observance.

 

 

Monday, May 26, 2014

In May 1933, President Roosevelt abolished the Board of Indian Commissioners created in the 1800s to oversee Indian appropriations.

 

 

Friday, May 23, 2014

On this day in 1939, Indian Reorganization Act constitution and bylaws were ratified for several Alaska Native villages including Kotzebue and Point Lay.

 

 

Thursday, May 22, 2014

In May 2008, a group of people who signed the Dawes Roll were honored at the Oklahoma State Capitol. Tribal and state leaders recognized eight people who were at the time believed to be the last living signees. More than 100,000 names are on the rolls, which were used for tribal membership and land allotment in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

 

 

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

In May 2012, the Oregon Board of Education voted to ban Indian mascots in schools. The issue then went to the state legislature. The governor signed a bill this year giving schools an opportunity to keep their Indian mascots.

 

 

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

In May 1876, executive order created the Cabazon reservation for the Cabazon Band of Mission Indians. Members of the Southern California tribe moved many times due to settlers and railroad expansion.

 

Monday, May 19, 2014

In May 1903, U.S. officials forcibly removed the Pala Band of Mission Indians in California from their native homeland to the Luiseno reservation 40-miles away. They had lost court battles and were ordered to leave the land. The Pala band refer to the journey as their "Trail of Tears."

 

Friday, May 16, 2014

In May 2002, Gordons Island in Maine was returned to the Passamaquoddy Tribe. The island was a burial site for many of the tribes ancestors who died of small pox in the 1800s.

 

Thursday, May 15, 2014

In May 1989, Nebraska set precedent in Native American repatriation efforts with its new law establishing procedures to follow when human remains are discovered in the state. The move came after calls to return Pawnee remains. The Unmarked Human Burial Sites and Skeletal Remains Protection Act was passed and signed into law. Federal law regarding Native American human remains was enacted in 1990.

 

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

In May 2007, Virginia tribal leaders met Queen Elizabeth during events to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Jamestown. Many Native people were hoping for an apology for the impacts English settlement had on their way of life. Native Americans were mentioned in the queens address, but there was no apology.

 

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

On this day in 2013, the school board in Chamberlain, South Dakota denied a request to include a Lakota honor song at graduation. Native people protested the vote and have repeatedly asked for the honor song to be included in the high school graduation ceremony.

 

Monday, May 12, 2014

In May 1995, the Alutiiq Museum and Archaeological Repository opened in Kodiak, Alaska.

 

Friday, May 9, 2014

During this week in 1999, a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Alaska Native Heritage Center took place in Anchorage, Alaska. The center shares the rich heritage of Alaska Native people.

 

Thursday, May 8, 2014

In May 1864, Stand Watie was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. The Cherokee man is known to be the only Indian to receive the distinction. Hes also said to be the last Confederate General to surrender.

 

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

In May 2012, the Bureau of Indian Affairs honored William Louis Pappan, the first Native American Alcohol Tobacco Firearms and Explosives Investigator killed in the line of duty. His name was unveiled on the Indian Country Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in New Mexico. His death was in 1935 during late-night inspections at an Oklahoma club.

 

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

In May 2009, the U.S. Senate confirmed Dr. Yvette Roubideaux as director of the Indian Health Service.

 

Monday, May 5, 2014

In May 2013, hundreds of visitors traveled to Wrangell, Alaska for the rededication of the Shakes Island Tribal House. It was rebuilt after years of harsh weather took toll on the 1940s structure. The celebration included traditional Native foods, games, storytelling, canoeing and dancing

 

Friday, May 2, 2014

In May 1923, the 14-cent stamp featuring Brule Sioux leader Hollow Horn Bear was issued in the U.S. The designed was based on a photograph of the chief.

 

Thursday, May 1, 2014

On this day in 1999, the educational and cultural institution, the Alaska Native Heritage Center, opened in Anchorage.

 

 

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

In April 2013, the U.S. Department of Justice honored the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nations Tribal Victim Services program. It was recognized for creating a healing arts program for sexual assault victims. The Kansas tribes program was among others and individuals awarded in Washington, D.C. during National Crime Victims Rights Week.

 

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Today we remember Army Sergeant John Raymond Rice who was born in April 1914. The Ho-Chunk man was killed in action during the Korean War. He had many military awards and honors. Rice was denied burial by an Iowa cemetery because he was Native American. President Truman ordered Rice be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

 

Monday, April 28, 2014

In April 2012, the Cherokee Nation enacted the Free Press Protection and Journalist Shield Act to protect journalists from disclosing certain information in tribal proceedings.

 

Friday, April 25, 2014

Today we remember George Horse Capture Sr. who passed away in April 2013. He was one of the first Native American museum curators in the U.S. Horse Capture Sr. was in charge of the Plains Indian Museum at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Wyoming. He also worked at the National Museum of the American Indian and was involved in books, film and television. The Gros Ventre man was 75-years-old at the time of his death.

 

Thursday, April 24, 2014

On this day in 2007, Amnesty International released the report Maze of Injustice: The failure to protect Indigenous women from sexual violence in the USA. It showed high rates of crimes committed against Native women and was intended to bring attention to policy makers.

 

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Australians will mark the national holiday ANZAC Day this week. Its the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during World War I. ANZAC stands for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were present in the Army Corps. Their contributions were greater during World War II, yet they received little to no recognition on their return or in following decades.

 

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

The Navajo Nation recognizes its sovereignty with a holiday in April. The tribe remembers a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court. In the 1980s, the court recognized the tribe's ability to tax without the approval of the Secretary of the Interior. Navajo Nation Sovereignty Day was created in 1985.

 

Monday, April 21, 2014

On this day in 1869, Seneca member Donehogawa, or Ely Samuel Parker became the first Native American to be appointed as commissioner of Indian Affairs. Parker also drew up the Appomattox surrender papers that General Robert E. Lee signed to end the American Civil War in 1865.

 

Friday, April 18, 2014

On this day in 1977, American Indian Movement Activist Leonard Peltier was convicted of two counts of first-degree murder for killing two FBI agents. He is currently serving two consecutive life terms at the federal prison in Leavenworth, Kansas.

 

Thursday, April 17, 2014

During this week in 1990, the Pawnee, Wichita and Arikara tribes held a reburial ceremony for more than 100 ancestors in Kansas. The site was a tourist attraction, but was returned to the tribes under federal law

 

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

On this day in 1528 the first significant exploration of Florida occurred when Spanish soldier, explorer, and Indian fighter Panfilo de Narvaez sights Indian houses near what is now Tampa Bay. Narvaez claimed Spanish royal title to the land.

 

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

During this week in 1907, Onondaga long distance runner Tom Longboat won the Boston Marathon. Longboat was later inducted in the Canadian Indian Hall of Fame and the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.

 

Monday, April 14, 2014

During this week in 1878, the Sheldon Jackson School was founded in Sitka, Alaska. It was first established as an industrial and training school for Tlingit boys. The school later became a private four-year college.

 

Friday, April 11, 2014

In April 2013, the Texas Legislature passed a bill to establish an American Indian Heritage Day on the last Friday of September. The legislation was signed into law the next month. Celebrations were held on the first official holiday in recognition of the historical, cultural, and social contributions of Native Americans to the state.

 

Thursday, April 10, 2014

In April 1969, a group of Port Chilkoot totem carvers in Alaska were contracted to create a totem for a world expo in Japan.

 

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Today we remember Wilma Mankiller. She was the first female principal chief of the Cherokee Nation. Mankiller passed away in April 2010, shortly after it was announced she had cancer. Mankiller held elected office for more than a decade and was an advocate for American Indians. The 2013 film The Cherokee Word for Water tells the story of the work that led to her leadership of the Oklahoma tribe.

 

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

In April 1934, Congress passed the Johnson OMalley Act to subsidize states for educational, medical and other services for Native Americans. Since its passage, Johnson O'Malley programs continue to address the unique cultural needs of Native students.

 

Monday, April 7, 2014

On this day in 2003, the California legislature voted in favor of a mining and sacred places bill. The bill included new open pit mines in protected areas of the California desert to be completely backfilled. Tribes fought for sacred site protection from mining including in an area called Indian Pass.

 

Friday, April 4, 2014

In April 1869, Ely Samuel Parker was appointed as the first American Indian to serve as commissioner of Indian Affairs. The Seneca man was a civil engineer, lawyer and Civil War officer.

 

Thursday, April 3, 2014

In April 1996, the United Methodist Church formally apologized to Cheyenne and Arapaho people for the Sand Creek Massacre. A Methodist minister was among the U.S. Cavalry to lead the attack in the 1800s. Many women, children and elderly were killed. The church later donated 50,000 dollars to the National Park Service to develop a learning center at the Colorado site.

 

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

In April 1910, Congress passed an act that forever waived tuition for Native American students at Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado. It began as an Indian school operated by the federal government. Colorado received ownership of it in exchange for the tuition waiver. In recent years, efforts in the state have challenged the waiver. Fort Lewis officials have said the non-tribal institution is a leading school in graduating Native students with bachelors degrees.

 

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

In April 2009, the Australian government adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The government said it would help reset relations. Australia voted against the declaration with the U.S., Canada and New Zealand when it was first adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2007.

 

 

Monday, March 31, 2014

In April 2009, the Australian government adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The government said it would help reset relations. Australia voted against the declaration with the U.S., Canada and New Zealand when it was first adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2007.

 

Friday, March 28, 2014

On this day in 1953, Native American Olympic and football legend Jim Thorpe died. The Sac and Fox native is the first and only person to win both the Pentathlon and Decathlon gold medals at the Olympics. He was proclaimed Athlete of the Century by ABCs Wide World of Sports.

 

Thursday, March 27, 2014

In March 2012, Colorados governor and Southern Ute and Ute Mountain Ute tribes participated in a ceremony to permanently install their tribal flags in the state capitol. Tribal and state leaders said it was a symbolic step in improving relationships.

 

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

During this week in 2013, more than 200 young people from Quebec First Nations finished a nearly one thousand mile journey to Ottawa. Their trek was inspired by the Idle No More movement. Issues they raised in Canadas capital included preserving Native language, culture and traditions.

 

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

In March 1970, the first Arctic Winter Games were held in Yellowknife, Canada. Participants competed in traditional games for a chance to take home the gold ulu.

 

Monday, March 24, 2014

In March 2013, Indigenous rights activists in Argentina called for the end to human rights abuses and trials for military crimes. People marked the National Day of Memory. It remembers the March 24, 1976 coup. Indigenous people were among those to suffer after the military overthrew the government and launched a dictatorship.

 

Friday, March 21, 2014

On this day in 1975, the Lac Courte Oreilles Lake Superior Band of Ojibwe settled their case against the State s Power Company. The companys dam flooded the reservation in the 1920s destroying wild rice beds, hunting grounds, a tribal village and a traditional burial ground.

 

Thursday, March 20, 2014

On this day in 1909, the Navajo National Monument was established. Three intact cliff dwellings of the Ancestral Puebloan people are preserved at the site in Arizona.

 

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

During this week in 1972, the nonprofit organization for Alaska Natives in the Arctic Slope Region was established.

 

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

On this date in 1954, Korean War soldier and Cherokee tribal member Charles George died by throwing himself on an enemy grenade. George's self-sacrifice saved his infantry and his actions won him the Congressional Medal of Honor.

 

Monday, March 17, 2014

On this day in 2002, Doctor Herman Charles Fredenberg, III died. Doctor Fredenberg was a member of the Menominee Nation and the second American Indian in the country to become a dentist. He was a longtime member of the Society of American Indian Dentists.

 

Friday, March 14, 2014

Today we remember Alaska Native leader Judson Brown who was born on this day in 1912. The Tlingit man was a public servant and career fisherman.

 

Thursday, March 13, 2014

In March 1909, Navajo National Monument was established in Arizona. It includes cliff dwellings and was once home to many different tribes.

 

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

In March 2013, President Obama signed the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act. Tribal leaders and advocates celebrated its passage as an effort to protect Native women. Provisions permit tribes to investigate, prosecute and convict non-Indian offenders who commit sexual assault and domestic violence. Three tribes recently began exercising this authority through a pilot project.

 

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The Fort Sill Apache Tribe in Oklahoma is commemorating 100 years of freedom this month. In 1886, Chiricahua and Warm Springs Apache people were removed from the southwest. They were shipped away as prisoners of war. According to the tribe, they were moved to Florida, Alabama and then Oklahoma. In March 1914, the last of the imprisoned Chiricahuas were freed. They were forced to leave Fort Sill and received individual land allotments in Southwest Oklahoma. They became known as the Fort Sill Apache Tribe.

 

Monday, March 10, 2014

On this day in 1861, poet Emily Pauline Johnson was born on the Six Nations reserve in Canada.

 

Friday, March 7, 2014

In March 1960, Canadas prime minister pushed legislation through Parliament to grant First Nations people the right to vote. They previously had conditional rights.

 

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Today we remember Native actor Jay Silverheels. He passed away this week in 1980. The Mohawk man was best known for his role as Tonto in The Lone Ranger television series.

 

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

On this day in 1948, Native American novelist, poet, and short story writer Leslie Marmon Silko was born.

 

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Today we remember William Paul who died on this day in 1977. The attorney was the first Alaska Native legislator who helped integrate public schools and win voting rights for Alaska Native people.

 

Monday, March 3, 2014

On this day in 1865, the Colorado River Indian Reservation was established. The reservation spans the Colorado River and has land in Arizona and California. It is home to four different tribes.

 

 

 

Friday, February 28, 2014

In February 1828, the first issue of the Cherokee Phoenix was published. It was printed in English and Cherokee.

 

Thursday, February 27, 2014

In February 1973, Oglala Lakota people and followers of the American Indian Movement occupied the town of Wounded Knee, South Dakota to draw attention to treaty rights. The incident drew international attention as it turned into a 71-day standoff with federal agents.

 

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

On this day in 2012, a totem pole was raised in Seattle in honor of First Nations woodcarver John T. Williams. Williams was shot and killed by a police officer. The incident sparked outrage by the Native community. The shooting was ruled unjustified and the officer resigned.

 

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

In February 1835, Baptist Missionary Jotham Meeker began printing the Shawnee Sun. It was the first periodical publication in Kansas and entirely in a Native language.

 

Monday, February 24, 2014

In February 2012, women were elected to serve on San Ildefonso Pueblos tribal council for the first time. Members were previously appointed, but an agreement allowed women to vote and run for a place on the 10-person council. The tribe is located in New Mexico, north of Santa Fe.

 

Friday, February 21, 2014

Today we remember Quechan elder and head bird singer Willard Golding. He passed away in February 2013 after an illness. Golding spent his life on the Fort Yuma reservation in Arizona. Bossman as he was often called, taught generations of bird singers and passed on the tradition to Colorado River tribes. Golding was 70-years-old at the time of his death.

 

Thursday, February 20, 2014

During this week in 1889, the Quileute reservation was established. The Washington Quileute tribe has become widely known due to being featured in the young adult vampire books and movies "Twilight."

 

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

On this day in 1858, Chief Leschi was hanged in present day Washington. The Nisqually leader was charged with murder. The chief and others insisted he had not committed the crime. Tribes in Washington have held events to commemorate the martyred leader, which often include walks and runs.

 

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

In February 2013, Olympic champion Billy Mills received the Presidential Citizens Medal at a White House ceremony. Mills was among more than a dozen awardees recognized for their commitment to public service. The Oglala Lakota man is a spokesperson for Running Strong for American Indian Youth. The organization works to strengthen Native communities, especially young people.

 

Monday, February 17, 2014

On this day in 1912, US President William Taft signed Executive Order 1483, which returned lands in New Mexico to the Navajo Nation. The order reversed a previous executive order in 1911.

 

Friday, February 14, 2014

On this day in 1931, Canyon De Chelly National Monument was established in Arizona. It's comprised entirely on Navajo trust land and remains home to residents within the canyons.

 

Thursday, February 13, 2014

In February 1974, Federal Judge George Boldt issued a historic ruling reaffirming fishing rights of treaty tribes in western Washington. The decision allocated 50 percent of the annual catch to them. Their fishing rights were being displaced by non-Natives. In the 1960s, Native people started fish-ins to reassert their rights and a lengthy court battle led to the decision. Tribes held a celebration last week to mark the court victory, which included leaders and fishermen.

 

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

On this day in 1599, Spanish Conquistador Juan De Onate ordered the punishment of Acoma people for an altercation, which included the killing of Spaniards. The sentence included cutting off one foot from men of fighting age and 20 years of servitude. Onate was later tried in Mexico with charges that included the excessive use of force. According to Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico, Spanish colonization brought many changes and the violence was a dark chapter in pueblo history.

 

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

In February 2013, the Michigan Department of Civil Rights filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights asking to prohibit Indian mascots in schools. The Michigan department said research shows Indian mascots negatively impact student learning. The complaint identified 35 public schools. The Department of Education later dismissed the complaint citing lack of sufficient evidence.

 

Monday, February 10, 2014

In February 1983, the United Nations granted Category Two Non-Governmental Organization status to the Inuit Circumpolar Conference. The ICC represents Inuit people in Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Russia.

 

Friday, February 7, 2014

During this month in 1885, the Lumbee were recognized as an Indian tribe by North Carolina. The tribe has long sough to gain federal recognition.

 

Thursday, February 6, 2014

During this week in 1985, Attu battlefield and airfields located in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska became a National Historic Landmark. Attu is the site of the only World War II land battle in North America. It was occupied by Japanese troops and recaptured by Americans. Indigenous people of the Aleutian Islands were impacted by the war.

 

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Today we remember Penobscot Chief Joseph Orono. He died on this day in 1801. The leader was known for fighting in many wars including on the American side during the Revolutionary War. He was believed to have been more than 100-years-old at the time of his death. The town of Orono in Maine is named in his honor.

 

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

In February 2008, then-Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd apologized to the country's Aboriginal people for past wrongs made by the government. He focused on the mistreatment of Aboriginal children who were taken away from their families by the government, known as the stolen generations.

 

Monday, February 3, 2014

Today we remember rock-and-roll star Ritchie Valens. Valens and musicians Buddy Holly and JP Richardson, known as The Big Bopper, died in a plane crash February 3, 1959, near Clear Lake, Iowa. Valens was 17-years-old at the time of his death. Valens, of Yaqui heritage, was inducted in the Native American Music Awards Hall of Fame in 2009.

 

 

Friday, January 31, 2014

On January 31, 1855, Makah leaders signed a treaty with the U.S. at Neah Bay, Washington. According to the Makah Nation, tribal forefathers saw it was a way to protect whaling, sealing, fishing and land rights by ceding land. Congress later ratified the treaty, which the tribe says sought assimilation.

 

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Today we remember Seminole leader Osceola who died on this day in 1838. According to the Seminole Tribe of Florida, the famous warrior led successful battles against five U.S. generals and murdered a U.S. Indian agent. He had a reputation of non-surrender. Osceola was captured and sent to a South Carolina prison where he passed away.

 

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

In January, Native people hold an annual commemoration at the site of the Bear River Massacre near Preston, Idaho. This years commemoration includes speakers and a drum ceremony. On January 29, 1863, U.S. soldiers attacked Shoshone people. Hundreds of men, women and children were killed.

 

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

In January 2004, Keisha Castle-Hughes, who was 13-years-old at the time, was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actress. She received the nod for her role as a young Maori girl in the film Whale Rider. The actress went on to other starring roles including in The Nativity Story and Star Wars Episode III.

 

Monday, January 27, 2014

In January each year, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people mark Survival Day, while the country officially recognizes Australia Day. It marks the landing of British ships there in the 1700s. Indigenous events often remember the impacts of colonialism, while acknowledging the survival and culture of Indigenous people.

 

Friday, January 24, 2014

Today we remember Native American ballerina Maria Tallchief who was born on this day in 1925. The Osage womans career included performances around the world. She was the prima ballerina for the New York City Ballet. Tallchief passed away at the age of 88 last year.

 

Thursday, January 23, 2014

During this week in 1860, Charles Curtis was born. He was an attorney and served in both the U.S. House and Senate for Kansas. Curtis was vice president during the Hoover administration. His father was white and his mother was Kaw. Curtis grew up in both Native and non-Native communities. He remained in Washington, D.C. to practice law after retiring from public office.

 

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

In January 2013, a meeting was held between First Nations leaders and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper. It came after Idle No More protests and a hunger strike by a Native leader. The meeting to address First Nations issues divided leaders and was boycotted by many chiefs.

 

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

In January 2000, the U.S. Mint issued the Sacagawea dollar coin featuring the Shoshone woman with a child on her back. In 2009, the Native American Dollar Coin Program began with Sacagawea on one side and the reverse design changing annually to honor the contribution of tribes or individual Native Americans. The 2014 design commemorates Native hospitality during the Lewis and Clark Expedition. It depicts a man offering a pipe and a woman offering fish, corn, roots and gourds.

 

Monday, January 20, 2014

In January 1962, the U.S. Interior Department approved the Miccosukee Constitution and the tribe was officially recognized as the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida.

 

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Today we remember Honorary Chief Marie Smith Jones who died in January 2008 in Alaska. She was the last speaker of the Eyak language.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

On this day in 1945, Army First Lieutenant Jack Montgomery was awarded the Medal of Honor. The Cherokee man from Oklahoma was recognized for his actions in Italy during World War II. In February 1944, Montgomery attacked three strong enemy positions alone. His actions that morning lead to 11 enemy dead, 32 prisoners and an unknown number of wounded. Later, while helping an adjacent unit, he was struck by mortar fragments and seriously wounded.

 

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

In January 1975, President Gerald Ford signed the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act to further the self-determination of Indian communities without terminating their relationships with the federal government, which included operating their own programs and schools.

 

Monday, January 13, 2014

In January 1923, Ira Hayes was born in Arizona. The Native American became famous after he helped raise the U-S flag on Iwo Jima during World War II.

 

Friday, January 10, 2014

Today we remember Chickasaw Nation Governor Cyrus Harris who passed away this week in 1888. Harris was an advocate for Chickasaw people before and after removal from their traditional homelands east of the Mississippi River to Oklahoma. He was the first elected governor of the Chickasaw Nation after the tribes constitution was adopted in 1856. He served five different two-year terms until 1874.

 

Thursday, January 9, 2014

On this day in 2003, a ceremony and reburial was held in Cuba for the remains of Taino people. The Smithsonian returned the remains, which were removed from their graves in 1915.

 

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

On this day in 2013, a federal court ruled Metis and non-status Indians in Canada qualified as Indians under the Constitution Act and therefore are under Canadian government jurisdiction. The ruling came after more than a decade long legal battle. They wanted access to benefits status Indians receive including health care and education.

 

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

On this day in 2013, California Assemblyman Roger Hernandez introduced a bill to replace Columbus Day with Native American Day and make it a state holiday. South Dakota is one state that already does that.

 

Monday, January 6, 2014

During this week in 2012, Maryland Governor Martin OMalley signed two Executive Orders recognizing Indian status for two groups. The Piscataway Indian Nation and the Piscataway Conoy Tribe became the first state recognized tribes in Maryland history.

 

Friday, January 3, 2014

In January 1987, National Native News went on the air from Anchorage, Alaska. The program is now produced in Albuquerque, New Mexico and heard on tribal and public radio stations across the U.S. and Canada.

 

Thursday, January 2, 2014

In January 2013, a ceremony was held in Durango, Colorado to welcome a totem pole to Fort Lewis College. The pole recognizes and celebrates Alaska Native students. The colleges Native American Center commissioned David Boxley to carve the pole.

 

Wednesday, January 1, 2014

On this day in 1965, the Nisqually Nation issued a proclamation denouncing the Washington tribe's treatment by the US government. The tribe highlighted treaties and hunting and fishing rights. The proclamation also compared the treatment of Native Americans to the treatment of Jews under Hitler.

 

 

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

On this day in 1881, a convention of Osage representatives adopted a constitution in Pawhuska, Oklahoma. The constitution was signed by the Osage Nation principal chief in March of 1882.

 

Monday, December 30, 2013

On this day in 1853, the Gadsen Purchase was made. The purchase added southern parts of Arizona and New Mexico to United States territory. Most of the nearly 46-thousand square miles were lands claimed by Native Americans.

 

Friday, December 27, 2013

Today is the birthday of Ray Mala. The Inupiaq actor was born Ray Wise in Candle, Alaska in 1906. He appeared in more than 25 films and also worked as a cinematographer during his career in Hollywood.

 

Thursday, December 26, 2013

During this month in 1980, the US Post Office issued the Sequoyah stamp. Sequoyah is credited with creating the Cherokee written language.

 

Monday, December 23, 2013

During this month in 1973, The Menominee Restoration Act was signed by President Richard Nixon. The Act reversed the previous termination of the Wisconsin tribes recognition in 1954 by the US government

 

Friday, December 20, 2013

On this day in 1935, the US Department of the Interior approved the constitution and bylaws of the Pueblo of Santa Clara.

 

Thursday, December 19, 2013

In December 1980, Native radio station KIDE went on the air. The station is owned by the Hoopa Valley Tribe in California

 

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

On this day in 1971, the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act was signed into law to settle land claims.

 

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Today we remember U.S. Hawaii Senator Daniel Inouye who passed away on December 17, 2012. Tribal leaders across the country say he was a forceful advocate for Native Americans. Inouye worked for years trying to get legislation passed on Native Hawaiian federal recognition. He died from respiratory complications at the age of 88.

 

Monday, December 16, 2013

In December 2012, Attawapiskat First Nation Chief Theresa Spence began a hunger strike to draw attention to First Nations issues. The leader wanted to persuade the Canadian government to take their concerns seriously. Her community had declared a state of emergency because some people were living in unheated sheds. The protest lasted six weeks as Spence subsisted on broth and tea. Attawapiskat still struggles with substandard living conditions and housing shortages. The government is reportedly working to build housing units on the Ontario reserve.

 

Friday, December 13, 2013

In December 1970, President Richard Nixon signed a bill to return Blue Lake to Taos Pueblo in New Mexico. The lake and surrounding land was taken in the early 1900s by the federal government and became National Forest Land. Taos Pueblo considers the area sacred and fought for its return. Blue Lake and mountains are off-limits to everyone, but Taos Pueblo members.

 

Thursday, December 12, 2013

In December 2007, a ceremony was held in South Dakota for items of Sitting Bull. A Smithsonian museum returned a pair of leggings and hair to descendants of the Lakota leader.

 

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Red Fox James headed an efforts to establish a national holiday recognizing Native Americans. In December 1915, he presented endorsements from 24 state governments to the White House for a day to honor Native people. The Blackfoot man rode horseback from state to state to generate support.

 

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

On this day in 1991, then-President George Bush signed legislation to change the name of the Custer Battlefield Monument to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument and create an Indian memorial. Located in Montana, the site is where Native people fought U.S. soldiers. In 1876, Lt. Col. George Custer and more than 200 soldiers died in the battle against more than a thousand Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho warriors.

 

Monday, December 9, 2013

On this day in 1924, the Wupatki National Monument was established in Arizona to preserve pueblo ruins and other archeological sites.

 

Friday, December 6, 2013

On this day in 2012, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack released a report on sacred sites calling for the USDA and the Forest Service to work more closely with tribes on access and protection of sites. Employee training on tribal history, law and culture was a recommendation.

 

Thursday, December 5, 2013

During this week in 1973, Shirley Plume was appointed superintendent of the Standing Rock Agency in North Dakota becoming the first Native women to hold such a Bureau of Indian Affairs position.

 

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

On this day in 2000, then-U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Bill Richardson signed an agreement to returned more than 80,000 acres of land to the Northern Ute Tribe. In 1916, the government took the land in Utah called the Naval Shale Reserve No. 2. It was taken from the Ute reservation to secure its rich oil shale deposits as a potential source of fuel for the Navy's oil-burning ships.

 

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

In December 2012, Bishop Richard Garcia of the Diocese of Monterey in California offered a mass of reconciliation and apologized to Native people. The mass was held at the Mission of San Juan Bautista. The apology to Mutsun people was for abuses they suffered during Spanish colonization of the area.

 

Monday, December 2, 2013

In December 1980, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 19-cent stamp honoring Sequoyah, the inventor of the Cherokee syllabary. He devised a set of characters and symbols to represent spoken syllables in the Cherokee language. Translations in Cherokee have been used in books, hymns and the tribal newspaper.

 

Friday, November 29, 2013

During this week in 2012, the Interior Department announced final steps in implementing the more than three billion dollar Cobell vs. Salazar settlement for the federal government's mismanagement of individual Indian trust accounts.

 

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Happy birthday to Native radio station KYNR. Located in Toppenish, Washington, the Voice of the Yakama Nation went on the air in November 2000.

 

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

On this day in 1911, the village of Hydaburg in Southeast Alaska was found by Haida people. During the 1700s, they migrated from Canada to the predominantly Tlingit area. The community is located on Prince of Wales Island and the people have a cultural relationship to the land and sea.

 

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

In November 2011, Kansas Governor Sam Brownback issued a proclamation apologizing to tribes in the state for past mistreatments including forced relocation. It was part of events to mark 150 years of statehood. This month, Brownback publicly apologized for Indian boarding schools at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence.

 

Monday, November 25, 2013

In November 1952, Charles George saved the lives of his fellow Army soldiers by jumping on a grenade during the Korea War. The Cherokee man was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

 

Friday, November 22, 2013

In November 2012, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Crow Creek Sioux Tribe and the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community reacquired Pe Sla, a sacred site in the Black Hills of South Dakota. The tribes say the Black Hills were protected by treaties, but violated by the U.S. The tribes say possession of the land is healing for the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota people. Landowners had originally put up the area for sale to the highest bidder, but later cancelled an auction. A nationwide campaign helped raise money for the reacquisition.

 

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Today we remember Chief Walter Northway who died November 21, 1993 in Alaska. The Athabascan leader was believed to be 117-years-old at the time. He was known for preserving traditional ways.

 

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

In November 2012, Gmail unveiled its Cherokee language setting. The Cherokee Nation teamed up with Google to integrate the language in the email service. Gmail and Google Web Search both include a virtual keyboard for typing the Cherokee syllabary. The Oklahoma tribe said it was an opportunity to use technology to encourage everyday use of the language, especially among young people.

 

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

In November 1991, the Bristol Bay Native Corporation Education Foundation was officially incorporated to provide scholarships and promote cultural heritage.

 

Monday, November 18, 2013

In November 2009, a reconciliation ceremony was held in New York in front of the National Museum of the American Indian in Lower Manhattan. The Collegiate Church officially apologized to Lenape people for past mistreatments. The church was started by Dutch settlers in the 1600s and Indigenous inhabitants in the area were massacred and displaced.

 

Friday, November 15, 2013

On November 16, 1990, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act was enacted. NAGPRA provides a process for museums and federal agencies to return certain Native American sacred items, human remains, and cultural and funerary objects to tribes.

 

Thursday, November 14, 2013

On this day in 1908, Alaska Native leader Dr. Walter Soboleff was born. The Tlingit pastor passed away in 2011 at age 102.

 

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

In November 1871, the San Carlos Apache Reservation was established by executive order. Located in southeastern Arizona, the reservation spans three counties with a landscape that ranges from alpine meadows to desert.

 

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

On this day in 2012, Navajo Code Talker Chester Nez received a diploma from the University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The veteran left the school 60 years earlier after exhausting his GI Bill. Nez was honored and presented the degree at KU in Lawrence.

 

Monday, November 11, 2013

In November 2005, the Canadian government announced its two billion dollar compensation plan for former students of Indian residential schools for physical, mental and sexual abuse. The government sent out checks, made an official apology and established a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to document the experiences of students.

 

Friday, November 8, 2013

On this day in 1978, the Indian Child Welfare Act became law. It was designed to keep Native children with Native families. The law was recently in the national spotlight in Adoptive Couple vs. Baby Girl, known as the Baby Veronica case. Cherokee Nation citizen Dusten Brown cited the law in the long legal battle. Brown and a South Carolina couple fought for custody of his daughter Veronica. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled the law did not apply. Last month, Brown announced he was ending litigation.

 

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Today we remember a Native leader who advocated for the advancement of Aboriginal interests in Canada. Jim Sinclair died November 9, 2012 after battling cancer. He was a founding member of the Native Council of Canada and the Metis National Council. He led an effort to have Metis recognized in the countrys Constitution. He also pursued First Nations and Metis rights internationally by meeting with the British Queen and the Catholic Pope. Sinclair was 79 at the time of his death.

 

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

In November 2012, Navajo Army Veteran Wilson Halona was honored decades after his military service in World War II. During a ceremony in New Mexico, U.S. Senator Tom Udall presented him five medals. In 1944, Halonas battalion defeated German bunkers and was later tasked with guarding Hitlers top generals. Among the honors were the Good Conduct Medal and the World War II Victory Medal.

 

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

In November 1944, the National Congress of American Indians was established in response to termination policy. About 80 delegates from 50 tribes gathered in Denver, Colorado. The founding members stressed the need for protection of treaty and sovereign rights. They also committed to better the quality of life of Native people.

 

Monday, November 4, 2013

During this week in 1912, the Alaska Native Brotherhood was established during a meeting in Juneau, Alaska to represent Native and civil rights. The organization, with the later founded Alaska Native Sisterhood, also fought for land claims.

 

Friday, November 1, 2013

On this day in 2012, the Inter-Tribal Buffalo Council and other groups held the first National Bison Day. This year, U.S. South Dakota Senator Tim Johnson introduced a resolution to designate November 2nd as the day to celebrate bison as a living symbol of the U.S. and recognize the role bison have in Native culture.

 

 

Thursday, October 31, 2013

In October 1986, Congress enacted the Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act to appropriate funds for treatment programs.

 

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

During this week in 2012, the Shinnecock Indian Nation, Mohegan Tribe of Indians and Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation declared states of emergency after Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast. Among the things tribes in Sandys path reported were power outages and damages to homes and buildings.

 

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

On this day in 1918, the town of Juneau was quarantined to help prevent the spread of Spanish influenza. The flu killed millions of people around the world. In Alaska, many Native people were hit by the epidemic and in some cases entire villages were killed.

 

Monday, October 28, 2013

During this week in 1986, Congress enacted the Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Prevention Act for tribes to develop and implement treatment and prevention programs.

 

Friday, October 25, 2013

On this day in 2012, 48 First Nations and Metis communities were awarded medals by Canada for their contributions during the War of 1812. They served with English and French forces against Americans.

 

Thursday, October 24, 2013

During this week 1949, the Effigy Mounds, built by Eastern Woodland Tribes, were designated a National Monument in Iowa. The mounds are in shapes of mammals, birds and reptiles.

 

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

In October 1988, Congress enacted the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act. It established federal regulations for gaming and protects it as a means of generating tribal revenue.

 

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

On this day in 2012, activist and actor Russell Means passed way on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota after battling cancer. Means had roles in films like the "Last of the Mohicans." The Oglala Lakota man was also known for his involvement in the American Indian Movement. He was 72-years-old at the time of his death. Family and friends are honoring the late-Means next month in Denver.

 

Monday, October 21, 2013

On this day in 2012, Kateri Tekakwitha was canonized a saint by the Catholic Church. She was one of seven officially declared a saint by Pope Benedict the 16th during a ceremony in Rome. Known as Lily of the Mohawks, she was born in the 1600s in present day New York. Shes the Catholic Saint of ecology, nature and the environment.

 

Friday, October 18, 2013

In October 2011, University of Manitoba President David Barnard apologized for Canadas Indian residential schools. He said while post-secondary institutions did not fund or operate the schools, the university failed to recognize and challenge the residential school system. Many students were abuse at the schools.

 

Thursday, October 17, 2013

This month, urban Native radio station KNBA celebrates its 17th anniversary. It signed on air in Anchorage, Alaska in 1996.

 

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

In October 2005, two Connecticut tribes were denied federal recognition status. The Eastern Pequot and Schaghticoke tribes received the decisions from the Interior Department. There are currently two tribes in the state that are federally recognized. Leaders of the Eastern Pequot, Schaghticoke and Golden Hill Paugussett nations recently said in a news report theyre eyeing proposed changes to the federal recognition process, which may help them gain the status. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is considering reforms.

 

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

During this week in 1966, the first statewide Alaska Federation of Natives conference was held. The annual event today draws thousands of people to address issues facing Alaska Native communities.

 

Monday, October 14, 2013

Today we remember the lead plaintiff in the historic class action Indian trust lawsuit Cobell vs. Salazar. In October 2011, Elouise Cobell died after battling cancer. The Blackfeet woman led the more than a decade long legal battle against the federal government over the mismanagement of individual Indian trust accounts. The suit ended with a more than three billion dollar settlement.

 

Friday, October 11, 2013

During this month in 1986, the US Congress designated the Nez Perce Historical Trail. The 1,170 mile trail begins in Oregon and ends in Montana.

 

Thursday, October 10, 2013

In October 2003, Canadian Jordin Tootoo became the first Inuk professional hockey league player during his debut with the Nashville Predators. Tootoo, now a forward with the Detroit Red Wings, was recently off the lineup after suffering a shoulder injury. In July, he visited Nunavut where he addressed issues facing many communities in the Canadian territory like suicide and alcoholism. The two issues have impacted him personally.

 

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

In October 2003, a statue of Sakakawea was dedicated at the U.S. Capitol. The Shoshone woman is famous for taking part in the Lewis and Clark expedition. The bronze statue, given to Statuary Hall by North Dakota, stands eight feet and depicts Sakakawea with an infant on her back. The ceremony included Native drumming, singing and dancing.

 

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

During this week in 2009, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution to offer an apology from the United States government to American Indians. The resolution was included in the Defense Appropriations bill and did not serve as a settlement or resolve challenges facing Native people. President Obama later signed the spending bill into law.

 

Monday, October 7, 2013

Today we remember a female pioneer in the Navajo legal system. In October 2003, Claudeen Bates Arthur was confirmed as chief justice of the Navajo Nation Supreme Court. She was the first female named to the post and also said to be the first Navajo woman to become a licensed attorney. Bates Arthur previously served as the Navajo Nations Attorney General and on the legislative counsel. In 2004, she passed away at the age of 62, after battling cancer.

 

Friday, October 4, 2013

During this week in 1985, Chugach Heritage Foundation was established in Alaska for the preservation of culture, to provide scholarships and to study the needs of Native people in the Chugach Region.

 

Thursday, October 3, 2013

In October 2009, the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana lost a long fight for federal recognition status. The Bureau of Indian Affairs denied the tribe after a more than 30-year wait. The tribe continues to seek federal recognition. It has gone to Congress to pursue the status through legislation.

 

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

During this week in 2011, Phyliss Anderson was sworn in as the first woman chief in Mississippi Band of Choctaw history. With more than two decades of experience in tribal government, Anderson leads the 10,000-member tribe. She was named 2013 Political/State and Local Government Woman of the Year by the Mississippi Commission on the Status of Women.

 

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

In October 1962, the Institute of American Indian Arts opened in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The tribal college offers four-year fine arts degrees. The Institute celebrated 50 years in 2012 with events that included panel sessions, campus tours and storytelling.

 

 

Monday, September 30, 2013

In September 2005, a statue of Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo leader Popay was installed in the U.S. Capitol. It was given to Statuary Hall by New Mexico. Popay is known for leading the Pueblo Revolt against the Spanish in the 1600s.

 

Friday, September 27, 2013

On the fourth Friday in September, California celebrates Native American Day. In 1968, California Governor Ronald Reagan signed a resolution designating the fourth Friday in September as American Indian Day. Legislation was enacted in the 90s creating the day as an official state holiday. There are more than 100 federally recognized tribes in the state.

 

Thursday, September 26, 2013

In September 2010, Taos Pueblo held events to commemorated the 40th anniversary of the return of Blue Lake. In the early 1900s, the U.S. government placed the lake and surrounding land under Forest Service jurisdiction, which limited tribal access. It was returned to the New Mexico tribe after President Richard Nixon signed legislation.

 

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

On this day in 2012, Royal Canadian Mounted Police announced a break in a missing and murdered women case in the area known as the Highway of Tears. Police announced Bobby Jack Fowler from the U.S., who died in prison, was tied to one of the unsolved cases. Many women, mostly Aboriginal, have disappeared on the British Columbia highway going back decades.

 

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

During this month in 1978, the Pascua Yaqui Tribe in Arizona was federally recognized. A holiday is held on September 18th to celebrates the federal status.

 

Monday, September 23, 2013

During this month in 1978, Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The park protects ancestral pueblo cliff dwellings and archeological sites.

 

Friday, September 20, 2013

During this week in 2011, the New York State Senate Select Committee on State-Native American Relations held its inaugural meeting in Albany. The meeting addressed economic development and challenges. It included the Oneida, Seneca and St. Regis Mohawk tribes.

 

Thursday, September 19, 2013

On this day in 2004, Lummi people presented totem poles to the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. A ceremony was held to support the families of the people who died there during attacks on September 11th, 2001. The two upright 15-foot poles "Liberty and Freedom" feature bears. The crossbar "Sovereignty" join the poles together and feature eagles.

 

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

During this week in 2004, the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) opened on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. NMAI is dedicated to the culture, art, and history of Native peoples throughout the Western Hemisphere. The museum showcases a vast collection of Native objects spanning thousands of years.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Today we remember pueblo historian Dr. Joe Sando from Jemez Pueblo. He passed away in September 2011. Sando was a noted scholar and author of several books. He was a consultant and lecturer with a rich knowledge of New Mexicos 19 pueblos. He died of natural causes at 88-years-old

 

Monday, September 16, 2013

During this week in 1778, Delaware people, also known as Lenape, signed a treaty with the United States. They were among the first Indians to come in contact with Europeans in the early 1600s. Their traditional territory was on the East Coast, but many were forced to move westward through a handful of states. Some groups settled in present day Oklahoma and others fled to Canada.

 

Friday, September 13, 2013

Today we remember Athabascan elder Richard Frank from Old Minto, Alaska. He passed away in September 2012 at the age of 85. He was a tribal leader who worked to preserve the Native way of life and a World War Two Army veteran who founded the Alaska Native Veterans Association. Frank also helped establish the Fairbanks Native Association and worked closely with the Tanana Chiefs Conference.

 

Thursday, September 12, 2013

During this week in 1989, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 28-cent stamp honoring Sitting Bull. The portrait of the Lakota leader was based on photographs from Smithsonian Institution archives.

 

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

During this month in 2012, Cyril Scott was sworn in as president of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in South Dakota. He won the three-year term in a summer election.

 

Tuesday, September 10 , 2013

Happy Birthday to Native radio station WGZS. In September 2011, the Fond du Lac community radio station opened its doors and turned on the transmitter. The 50,000 watt station in Minnesota plays a variety of music and news programs. It is also streamed online for Fond du Lac employees.

 

Monday, September 9 , 2013

During this month in 1917, the Cocopah Indian Reservation was established. Its located near Yuma, Arizona. About 1,000 tribal members live and work on or nearby the reservation. The reservation is more than 6,000 acres and includes a casino, resort, speedway and other attractions.

 

Friday, September 6 , 2013

During this month in 2012, Federal Emergency Management Agency homes started to be delivered to the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota. Nearly two dozen FEMA mobile homes were being set up for families after housing on the reservation was damaged by summer storms.

 

Thursday, September 5 , 2013

During this month in 2012, seven tribes and some Native health organizations across the country participated in the 1st Annual Inter-Tribal Suicide Awareness Walk. They organized events in their communities during National Suicide Prevention week. Highlights included a walk in Baltimore, Maryland to the Indian center where balloons were released in solidarity with other tribal communities. The Muscogee Creek Nation in Oklahoma reported 100 people attended its event, which included a remembrance ceremony.

 

Wednesday, September 4 , 2013

During this month in 2012, the remains of Albert Afraid of Hawk were returned to South Dakota and a burial was held on the Pine Ridge reservation. The Lakota man traveled with Buffalo Bills Wild West Show in 1900. Afraid of Hawk died of food poisoning in Connecticut and his remains were in an unmarked grave until records were discovered in 2008. The repatriation process began in 2009 after his ancestors were located.

 

Tuesday, September 3 , 2013

During this month in 2011, a healing totem pole began a journey from Washington State to Maryland. It was carved with stories of healing, hope and knowledge and stopped in tribal communities along the way. The totem pole was created by a Lummi carver and commissioned for an exhibit at the Library of Medicine. The exhibit examined concepts of health and medicine among Native people.

 

Monday, September 2 , 2013

During this month in 2012, Habitat for Humanity started the first housing unit on First Nations settlement land in Canada. Construction took place in the Yukon near Whitehorse. The organization had already started projects to help First Nations families in urban areas a few years before the Yukon project.

 

 

Friday, August 30, 2013

During this month in 2012, a tribal office opened on the Wind River reservation in Wyoming to register sex offenders. The office was established under the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act to close reporting gaps among states, territories and in Indian Country.

 

Thursday, August 29, 2013

During this month in 1957, Seminole people voted to create The Seminole Tribe of Florida. The vote established a governmental entity and a charted corporation to conduct economic development for the tribe. The tribe now owns several businesses and has fought for sovereignty and self-determination to retain Seminole language, culture and way of life

 

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

During this month in 2012, after years of dispute the Muscogee Creek Nation and Oklahoma signed a new tobacco agreement. It included an end to litigation and set a tax on cigarettes.

 

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

During this month in 2012, Canadian Prime Minister Steven Harper named Leona Aglukkaq as the countrys ambassador on the International Arctic Council. The Inuk woman from Nunavut assumed the position in May and will chair the council for two years.

 

Monday, August 26, 2013

Today we remember Shakopee Mdewakanton Community Chairman Stanley Crooks who passed away in August 2012. Crooks was leader of the Minnesota tribe for more than 20 years. He was part of the tribes successful gaming industry. Crooks was also a Navy veteran who served during the Cuban missile crisis.

 

Friday, August 23, 2013

During this week in 2012, land owners cancelled the auction of some 2,000 acres of Black Hills land in South Dakota. The area known as PeSla is considered sacred by Lakota people. A nationwide campaign was held to raise money to buy the land. It was later acquired by tribes.

 

Thursday, August 22, 2013

During this month in 1908, Mary Ross was born. Ross was the first female engineer for Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. She contributed to aerospace technology used in space flight and ballistic missiles. Ross was an advocate for more female and Native American science students.

 

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

During this month in 2011, the Alutiiq Museum earned accreditation from the American Association of Museums becoming the seventh in Alaska and the second tribal institution in the U.S. to earn the high level national certification.

 

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

During this month in 2009, Dr. Joseph Medicine Crow received the Medal of Freedom. The Crow man was honor at a White House ceremony for his service in World War II and his many cultural contributions.

 

Monday, August 19, 2013

During this week in 2012, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius met with tribal communities in South Dakota. She discussed health challenges and saw their programs firsthand.

 

Friday, August 16, 2013

During this month in 1986, an Act of Congress restored federal recognition to the Klamath Tribes in Oregon. Government termination policy decades earlier heavily impacted the tribes.

 

Thursday, August 15, 2013

During this month in 2011, Aleut people in St. Paul, Alaska celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Northern Fur Seal Treaty. The document put restrictions on commercial sealing to save the species from extinction.

 

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

On this day in 1983, Wilma Mankiller became deputy chief of the Cherokee Nation and later served as principal chief. Mankiller was an advocate for American Indians until her death in 2010 after battling cancer. The recent film The Cherokee Word for Water tells the story of her work that led to her leadership of the Oklahoma tribe.

 

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

On this day in 2012, the U.S. Department of the Interior began a series of tribal listening sessions on sacred sites. The meetings focused on developing polices, protecting sites and securing tribal access. The sessions were held at various locations across the country in August.

 

Monday, August 12, 2013

During this week in 1987, the U.S. Postal Service issued a stamp in honor of Oglala Sioux Chief Red Cloud. The Lakota leader is known for fighting for his people.

 

Friday, August 9, 2013

On this day in 2012, the International Day of the Worlds Indigenous Peoples recognized Indigenous media. An event was held at the United Nations headquarters in New York. It included a panel of speakers from ?Indigenous media organizations and the screening of a film. The day is celebrated annually on August 9th.

 

Thursday, August 8, 2013

During this week in 2012, television news director Jason Vincent resigned after posting a controversial Facebook comment. It read, add drunk, homeless, Native American man to the list of animals that have wandered into my yard. Vincent apologized and his Duluth, Minnesota Fox affiliate said he took another assignment.

 

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

During this month in 2012, a grand opening ceremony was held for Frog Bay Tribal National Park in Wisconsin. The Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa opened the park after buying nearly 90 acres of privately owned land. The area includes a stretch of sandy beach along Lake Superior and forest trails.

 

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

During this week in 2012, U.S. Montana Senator Max Baucus held a field hearing to address Indian health care. Funding and lack of services were some of the concerns raised during the hearing at the Crow-Northern Cheyenne Hospital in Montana. Tribal and federal officials were witnesses on the panel. Tribal leaders were asked to develop a list of solutions and submit them to the senators office.

 

Monday, August 5, 2013

During this month in 1948, a federal court ruled New Mexico had discriminated against Indians by restricting their vote. More than a month earlier, Miguel Trujillo Sr. from Isleta Pueblo attempted to register to vote and was refused. He sued the state and is credited for making it possible for Native Americans in New Mexico to vote.

 

Friday, August 2, 2013

During this week in 1816, Russian explorer Lt. Otto Von Kotzebue reaches a sound in present day Alaska. He gave the sound his name. Native people have long lived in the area they call Kikiktagruk, also known as the City of Kotzebue.

 

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Today we remember Ho-Chunk elder Angie Decorah. She was a founding member of the American Indian Center in Chicago, Illinois. The center was organized in the 1950s by the Indian community to assist Native people in the area. Decorah passed away of cancer in August 2012. She was 91-years-old at the time of her death.

 

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

During this week in 2010, President Obama signed the Tribal Law and Order Act into law. The legislation addresses crime in tribal communities. Among many things, it encourages the hiring of more law enforcement officers for tribal lands, provides tools for police and supports the development of alcohol and drug prevention programs for youth. National Native organizations, tribes and federal agencies continue to coordinate to implement the law.

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Today we remember an Alaska Native leader and advocate of traditional science. Caleb Pungowiyi headed the Inuit Circumpolar Conference and held numerous other positions, which included marine conservation. He passed away of cancer in July 2011 at age 69.

 

Monday, July 29, 2013

During this month annually, Pacific Northwest tribes take part in a canoe journey. They canoe to neighboring nations and celebrate language, culture and fishing. The first such event began in the 1990s and today the canoe journey includes tribes from the U.S. and around the world.

 

Friday, July 26, 2013

World hoop dance champion Tony Duncan wrapped up a global tour last summer with musician Nelly Furtado. She helped bring Native American hoop dancing to the world stage with her song "Big Hoops, Bigger the Better."

 

Thursday, July 25, 2013

During this week in 2011, the U.S. Justice Department held a Native American Issues Subcommittee and Attorney Generals Advisory Committee Meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota. The meeting included 30 U.S. Attorneys with some Indian Country population in their districts to discuss a variety of issues in tribal communities.

 

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

During this month in 2012, First Nations leaders from across Canada reelected Shawn Atleo as national chief of the Assembly of First Nations. Atleo was voted in during the AFNs general assembly in Toronto on July 18 and began his second three-year term as leader.

 

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

During this month in 2012, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and U.S. Attorneys for South Dakota and North Dakota signed a Memorandum of Understanding. The agreement between the tribe and the U.S. Justice Department authorized the hiring of a Special Assistant U.S. Attorney to prosecute violence against women cases in tribal and federal courts.

 

Monday, July 22, 2013

Today we remember a Native artist who passed away this month in 1980. San Ildefonso Pueblo potter Maria Martinez was famous for black on black pottery. Martinez lived to be in her 90s.

 

Friday, July 19, 2013

During this week in 1972, the Alaska Native village corporation for King Island was officially incorporated. It's located in the Bering Straits Region.

 

Thursday, July 18, 2013

During this week in 1979, Jay Silverheels became the first American Indian actor to have a star placed on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame along Hollywood Boulevard. The Mohawk actor, born Harold J. Smith, played “Tonto”, in the Lone Ranger television series.

 

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

During this week in 1987, Canada and the United States signed an agreement for the conservation of the Porcupine Caribou Herd. The agreement addressed conservation and the use of the herd by Indigenous peoples.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

On this day in 1993, Ada Deer (Menominee) was confirmed as Assistant Interior Secretary of Indian Affairs. Deer was the first Native woman to head the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She resigned from the position in 1997.

Monday, July 15, 2013

On this day in 1948, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled in the case Harrison v. Laveen, which gave Native Americans in the state the right to vote.

Friday, July 12, 2013

During this week in 2011, the White House hosted a lacrosse clinic. It was part of the Lets Move! in Indian Country initiative. Native youth were among those learning about the sport from players including the Iroquois Nationals Team.

Thursday, July 11, 2013

During this month in 2012, President Obama signed the Helping Expedite and Advance Response Tribal Homeownership Act into law. It allows tribes to lease restricted lands for residential, business, public, religious, educational or recreational purposes without approval from the Interior Secretary.

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

During this week in 2012, then-U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and Taos Pueblo leaders signed three water contracts to settle a long-standing water rights case in New Mexico.

 

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

During this week in 2012, a Native American liaison was appointed to serve as an adviser to Oklahomas governor to provide a connection between the state and tribes.

 

Monday, July 8, 2013

Today we remember an Alaska Native elder who was laid to rest this week in 2012. Isaac Juneby was one of the last Han language speakers. He served in the Army, worked for the National Park Service and as chief of Eagle Village helped preserve traditional ways of life. Juneby was 71-years-old when he died in a car accident on July 1st, 2012.

Friday, July 5, 2013

On this day in 2012, the Navajo Nation council voted down the Navajo-Hopi Little Colorado River Water Settlement. U.S. Arizona Senators introduced legislation to settle tribal water claims, which needed approval from the Navajo and Hopi tribes.

Thursday, July 4, 2013

Aboriginal people in Australia celebrate their history, culture and achievements in July during NAIDOC week or the National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee. The committee was established in the 1920s to increase awareness of the status and treatment of Aboriginal people. Events are held across the country during the weeklong observance.

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

During this week in 2012, Zuni Pueblo was designated an official New Mexico MainStreet to help promote Zuni as a unique tourist and commerce site. Main Street is a national business development program.

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

On this day in 1924, Army Corporal Mitchell Red Cloud, Jr. was born. The Ho-Chunk-Winnebago man received a posthumous Medal of Honor for his bravery during the Korean War.

Monday, July 1, 2013

On this day in 1967, Chief Dan George spoke before thousands of people on Canadas 100th birthday at a Vancouver stadium in British Columbia. The Lament of Canada speech was about land and Native life before colonialism. George was an actor, author, poet and advocate for Indigenous people.

Friday, June 28, 2013

During this week in 1990, Petroglyph National Monument was established in Albuquerque, New Mexico to protect petroglyphs featuring images carved onto rocks by Indigenous people hundreds of years ago.

Thursday, June 27, 2013

During this month in 2012, Google and dozens of organizations launched an endangered languages website. The project put audio, video and other language resources online to help in language revitalization efforts.

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

On June 25 and 26, 1876 the Battle of the Little Bighorn took place in Montana. Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and his men died fighting Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho warriors. The area today includes an Indian Memorial honoring tribes that defended their way of life during the battle.

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

During this week in 2010, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healing Foundation launched a three-day event in Queensland, Australia. Topics included traditional medicine, intergenerational trauma and healing. The event followed the 2008 government apology to Aboriginal children removed from their homes, known as the Stolen Generations.

Monday, June 24, 2013

During this week in 1906, Mesa Verde National Park was established in Colorado. The park contains 600 cliff dwellings inhabited by pueblo people who lived in the Four Corners region more than a thousand years ago.

Friday, June 21, 2013

In June, Canadians celebrate National Aboriginal Day. The day recognizes the unique heritage, diverse cultures, and achievements of Canada's First Nations, Inuit and Mtis people.

Thursday, June 20, 2013

During this week in 2011, the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs held a hearing on the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act or NAGPRA, which provides a process for museums and federal agencies to return certain Native American cultural items, human remains, funerary and sacred objects to tribes. Senators, tribal leaders and federal officials focused on achieving policy goals of the law and looked at best practices and challenges.

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

During this month in 2008, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper officially apologized to former students of Indian Residential Schools on behalf of the government. Harper said students were removed from their homes and assimilated into the dominant culture. He said the government recognized that the policy of assimilation was wrong and caused great harm. Many former students said they were emotionally, physically and sexually abused at the church-run, government-funded schools. The schools were operated for more than a century.

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan holds a day of healing and remembering in June. The event recognizes the closing of the Mt. Pleasant Indian Industrial Boarding School in the 1930s. The tribe says abuses at the school, which operated for decades, rippled through generations.

Monday, June 17, 2013

During this month in 2012, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes celebrated the 30th anniversary of the Mission Mountain Tribal Wilderness Area. More than 90,000 acres in Northwest Montana were preserved for cultural and spiritual use.

Friday, June 14, 2013

During this month in 1992, President George Bush declared a "Year of Reconciliation Between American Indians and Non-Indians."

Congress also passed a law in 1992 declaring it the "Year of the American Indian." In his proclamation, President Bush asked that the country to honor America's Indigenous peoples and learn about each tribes "unique history, customs and traditions."

Thursday, June 13, 2013

During this month in 2011, a law went into effect making the Native American squash blossom necklace New Mexicos official necklace. The necklace often features silver squash blossom shaped beads with turquoise or other gemstones

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

During this month in 2011, First Lady Michelle Obama hosted tribal leaders, Native athletes and children at a Lets Move in Indian Country event at the White House. They planted a Three Sisters" garden that included corn, beans and squash. The Lets Move initiative focuses on ending childhood obesity with physical activity and healthy eating.

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

On June 11, King Kamehameha is honored in Hawaii. The day is recognized as a state holiday. Ceremonies, parades and other celebrations take place throughout communities to honor the chief who united the Hawaiian Islands in 1795.

Monday, June 10, 2013

During this month in 2012, the Justice Departments Office on Violence Against Women announced agreements to cross-designate tribal prosecutors for four tribes. The Tribal Special U.S. Attorneys would pursue violence against women cases in both tribal and federal courts. The Pueblo of Laguna, The Fort Belknap Tribe, the Winnebago Tribe and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe were the recipients.

Friday, June 7, 2013

During this week in 2012, tribal and U.S. Justice Department officials announced a pilot initiative to address sexual assaults on Montana reservations by establishing response teams. The plan included monthly meetings by attorneys, victim specialists, advocates and law enforcement to focus on incidences on reservations.

Thursday, June 6, 2013

During this month in 2012, the Oglala Sioux Tribe and the National Park Service signed an agreement on a management plan for the South Unit of Badlands National Park. The area is within the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota.

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

During this week in 2012, tribal, federal and state leaders broke ground on the Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project in New Mexico. The project will deliver water to thousands of Navajo people. It will also bring water to portions of the Jicarilla Apache Nation and the city of Gallup.

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

During this month in 2010, Native leaders and the Association of Canadian Deans agreed to promote education for Metis, Inuit and First Nations students. Goals included using Indigenous language and culture in the classroom and improving student retention rates.

Monday, June 3, 2013

During this month in 2012, the SuAnne Big Crow Boys and Girls Club on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota celebrated its 20th anniversary. The Boys & Girls Clubs of America said it was the first such club to be established in Indian Country. The celebration included the opening of a new 30,000 square foot facility with a soccer field, pool, gym and technology center. The club and others across the country serve Native youth and include programs to reduce gang-violence and promote healthy lifestyles.

Friday, May 31, 2013

During this month in 2011, Tiffany Smalley was awarded an undergraduate degree from Harvard University and with it came the distinction of being the first Wampanoag student to graduate from Harvard in more three centuries. Her predecessor earned a degree in 1665. Smalley also accepted a degree for a Wampanoag student who died before graduation.

Thursday, May 30, 2013

During this month in 2011, tribes in Maine and the state committed to create policies and uncover the mistreatment of Native children in the states child welfare system including past adoptions and the boarding school era. Tribal leaders and the governor signed an agreement last year to create a truth and reconciliation commission.

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

During this month in 2011, Navy Lt. Nicholas T. Redeye was presented several medals and awards decades after his military service. U.S. Congressman Steve Pearce recognized Redeye for being the only Native American to make 1,000 carrier landings, as well as, the only Cayuga man to have been a carrier fighter and torpedo bomber pilot in World War II and the Korean War. The veteran was honored at a ceremony in Los Lunas, New Mexico.

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

During this week in 2012, the Winnemem Wintu Tribe ended a four-day War Dance at a site on the McCloud River in California. The ceremony was held to convince the U.S. Forest Service to close part of the river for a coming-of-age ceremony. Leaders say recreational boaters have been a disruption in the past. An agreement was reached and a summer ceremony was held. The tribe is not federally recognized and not protected under tribal religious freedom laws.

Monday, May 27, 2013

During this month in 2009, Navajo Code Talker John Brown, Jr. died. He was one of the original 29 Navajos who first developed a code in their Native language and used it in military conversations during World War II.

Friday, May 24, 2013

On this day in 1996, President Bill Clinton issued the Indian Sacred Sites Executive Order. The decree made it mandatory for federal agencies allow access to sacred sites. The order called for Native Americans to be guaranteed ceremonial use of the land. President Clinton's order also pledged to protect sacred sites.

Thursday, May 23, 2013

On this day in 1838, federal troops began to forcibly remove Cherokees from the eastern United States. Many protested that the treaty outlining their relocation was illegal. The Cherokees' one thousand mile journey to Oklahoma is now known as the "Trail of Tears." More than 4,000 Cherokees died during the forced march.

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

On this day in 1945, the constitution and bylaws of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians were accepted by the US Department of the Interior. The tribe's members voted to ratify the constitution and government structure the month before.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

On this day in 1999, Cook Inlet Region, Incorporated dedicated the Talkeetna Alaskan Lodge. The ceremony included the unveiling of the Alaska Climbers Hall of Fame. The lodge offers views of Mt. McKinley also known as Denali, North America's highest peak and one of the most climbed mountains.

Monday, May 20, 2013

During this week in 2009, Larry Echo Hawk was sworn in as Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs. The Pawnee man held the position for nearly three years before resigning to take a leadership role in the Mormon Church.

Friday, May 17, 2013

During this month in 1999, the We the People March took place in Alaska with about 3,000 participants to raise awareness about subsistence and other Native issues.

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Today we remember the late-Navajo singer, songwriter and comedian Vincent Craig. He passed away this week in 2010 after battling cancer. Craigs best known for his humorous songs on reservation life. He was the creator of the Mutton Man comic strip and appeared in movies like "Turquoise Rose." His family is planning to make his work more widely available online.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

On this day in 2012, musician Carlos Santana released the album Shape Shifter dedicated to the worlds Indigenous people. He said the 13-song recording was created to encourage countries to honor their First People. Santana acknowledged the 2008 apology to Aboriginal people in Australia and the 2009 Native American Apology Resolution signed by President Obama.

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

During this week in 2012, the Oregon Board of Education voted to ban Indian mascots in schools. Schools were given about five years to retire them or risk losing state funding. Efforts are being made in the state legislature this year to loosen the policy.

Monday, May 13, 2013

The Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation in Arizona celebrates Sovereignty Day each May. In the early 1990s, tribes were negotiating gaming compacts with the state. On May 12, 1992, federal agents raided the tribe's casino and seized gaming machines. Tribal members blocked the road and kept agents from taking the machines. After a three-week standoff, Arizonas governor signed a compact. The tribe has since recognized the day as a holiday.

Friday, May 10, 2013

During this month in 2008, several American Indians who were among the original signers of the Dawes Roll were honored at the state Capitol in Oklahoma. Tribal and state leaders recognized eight people who at the time were believed to be the last living signees. More than 100,000 names are on the rolls, which were used for membership and land allotment in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Today we remember Navajo Code Talker Samuel Tso who passed away on this day in 2012 at a hospital surrounded by family in Farmington, New Mexico. Tso was among the Navajo men who used an unbreakable military code in their Native language during World War II. He was 89-years-old at the time of his death.

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

During this month in 2012, the Bureau of Indian Affairs honored the First Native American Alcohol Tobacco Firearms and Explosives Investigator killed in the line of duty. The name of William Louis Pappan was unveiled on the Indian Country Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Artesia, New Mexico. Pappan, from the Kaw Nation, was one of three Native ATF investigators during the prohibition and post-prohibition era. He was killed in 1935 during late-night inspections at a club in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

During this month in 2012, the Cherokee Nation held a grand opening for its national prison museum. The museum shows the history of crime and punishment of the Oklahoma tribe. It also relives infamous Cherokee outlaw stories. The Cherokee prison was the only penitentiary in Indian Territory from 1875 to 1901.

Monday, May 6, 2013

During this month in 1923, the 14-cent U.S. stamp was issued featuring an American Indian. The stamp was inspired by a photo of Brule Sioux leader Hollow Horn Bear. The photograph was taken in 1905 when the chief was in Washington, D.C. for the inauguration of President Theodore Roosevelt.

Friday, May 3, 2013

During this week in 1887, Cherokee Council member Ned Christie was falsely accused of murdering a U.S. Marshal. Christie was never convicted in court for any crime. He was assassinated after a five-year standoff with the federal government. Several witnesses came forward clearing Christie of any wrongdoing and he became a symbol of tribal sovereignty. Christie opposed railroad development through Indian Territory which some believe may have contributed to his troubles.

Thursday, May 2, 2013

During this month in 1883, Lakota Chief Sitting Bull was released from prison. He rejoined his tribe in Standing Rock, South Dakota, where he encouraged them not to sell their land. Sitting Bull is considered the last Sioux to surrender to the U.S. government.

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

On this day in 1999, the Alaska Native Heritage Center opened its doors in Anchorage. The center highlights the heritage of Alaska's eleven Native cultural groups.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Today we remember a Native American anthropologist who was born on this day in 1939. Dr. Alfonso Ortiz was from Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo. He earned a Ph.D in anthropology from the University of Chicago. His work included the book "The Tewa World: Space, Time, Being and Becoming in a Pueblo Society." Ortiz was an advocate for Native rights, education, and religious freedom. The Alfonso Ortiz Center for Intercultural Studies at the University of New Mexico was named in his honor after his death.

Monday, April 29, 2013

During this week in 2001, the New York State Education Department called on schools to end the use of Indian mascots. The measure was an effort to remove negative perceptions about Native Americans in schools. The U.S. Civil Rights Commission followed suit days later calling for the removal of Indian logos, mascots, and nicknames by non-Native schools and universities.

Friday, April 26, 2013

This week, Australia marks the anniversary of the first major military action it fought with New Zealand during World War I. There is now growing recognition of the role of Indigenous soldiers.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

On this day in 1914, Army Sergeant John Raymond Rice was born. The Ho-Chunk man was killed in action during the Korean War. Rice also served in World War II. He had many military awards and honors. A national controversy was sparked after a cemetery refused his burial in Sioux City, Iowa, because he was Native American. President Truman ordered Rice be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. He was buried with full honors almost a year after his death.

Tuesday, April 24, 2013

During this month in 2005, Tammy Cook-Searson was sworn in as leader of the Lac La Ronge Indian Band in Canada becoming its first female chief. The band is the largest First Nation in Saskatchewan..

Monday, April 23, 2013

During this month in 2012, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper signed a bill to allow elders or others with expertise in Native American language or culture to teach in public schools. Senate Bill 57 created a process for individuals with tribal knowledge to instruct in conjunction with a licensed teacher.

Monday, April 22, 2013

During this month in 2012, the Cherokee Nation enacted the Free Press Protection and Journalist Shield Act. The law protects journalists from disclosing certain information in tribal proceedings.

Friday, April 19, 2013

During this week in 1878, Sheldon Jackson School was founded in Sitka, Alaska as an industrial and training school for Tlingit boys.

Thursday, April 18, 2013

During this week in 2010, New Zealand announced its support of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The country's minster of Maori Affairs made the announcement at the UN in New York. New Zealand, the U.S., Canada and Australia first opposed the declaration when it was adopted by the General Assembly in 2007.

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

During this week in 1907, Onondaga long distance runner Tom Longboat won the Boston Marathon in a record time of two hours, 24 minutes and 24 seconds. Longboat was born on the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada. He was considered Canada's greatest runner. Longboat was inducted in the Canadian Indian Hall of Fame and the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

On this day in 1976, the United National Indian Tribal Youth organization or UNITY was incorporated as a non-profit organization in Oklahoma. It supports leadership development among Native American youth.

Monday, April 15, 2013

During this month in 2008, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names voted to change Squaw Peak in Phoenix, Arizona to Piestewa Peak. The mountain was renamed in honor of Lori Piestewa. The Hopi woman died while serving in the Army in Iraq. Last month, Piestewas family and friends held a memorial at the peak to honor her on the 10th anniversary of her death.

Friday, April 12, 2013

During this month in 2007, Amnesty International released a report showing Native women were two and a half times more likely to be raped or sexually assaulted. The also showed an overwhelming number of those crimes were committed by non-Native men. This year, Amnesty applauded the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act. Measures were included in the act to help with prosecutions.

Thursday, April 11, 2013

During this month in 2012, the Lower Elwah Klallam Tribe announced it was named Conservationist of the Year. The Northwest Chapter of the Society of Ecological Restoration awarded the Washington tribe and two people. They were honored for dam removal and ongoing watershed restoration efforts.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Today we remember a fallen Blackfeet Nation soldier. Antonio Burnside died in Afghanistan in April 2012. The Army Corporal was active in Blackfeet life before his death. The 31-year-old was laid to rest in Montana. Burnside was the second member of the tribe to be killed in Afghanistan. Master Sergeant William Carlson died in 2003.

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

During this week in 2012, the Alaska legislature passed a bill to help endangered Native languages by establishing an advisory council. The councils job is to find ways to protect and restore Alaska Native languages. The governor signed the bill into law the next month.

Monday, April 8, 2013

During this month in 2012, First Nation elders and former Indian residential school students adopted Archbishop James Weisgerber. The ceremony in Winnipeg was a gesture of reconciliation between the Catholic Church and former students. The Catholic Church was one of several churches involved in the schools. Many students reported abuse at the church-run, government-funded schools across Canada. The schools started in the mid-19th century. The last one closed in the 1990s.

Friday, April 5, 2013

During this week in 2009, the Australian government adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Thursday, April 4, 2013

On this day in 1981, some American Indian Movement members founded Yellow Thunder Camp on federal land in South Dakota. It was an effort to reclaim the Black Hills. AIM members wanted it to become a permanent site but were denied a permit.

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

On this day in 2012, a bill to grant state recognition to Tennessee groups passed a state Senate committee. Some Native American residents and out-of-state tribes opposed the measure to recognize six groups as Tennessee tribes.

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

On this day in 2012, the American Indian Studies department at the University of Minnesota launched an online tribal language dictionary. The Ojibwe People's Dictionary provides words, context, pictures, and audio clips. Ojibwe is an endangered language. The website is a tool in revitalization efforts.

Monday, April 1, 2013

On this day in 1866, Congress overrode President Andrew Johnson's veto of the Civil Rights Bill of 1866. The bill gave equal rights to all persons born in the United States except Native Americans.

Friday, March 29, 2013

On this day in 2012, tribal and federal officials celebrated the Port Gamble SKlallam Tribes foster care and adoption program. The Washington tribe became the first tribe in the country to receive federal approval to run its own Title Four-E program. The tribe now manages all social services under Title Four of the Social Security Act, including Child Welfare, Child Support, Child Care, and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families.

Thursday, March 28, 2013

On this day in 1920, Athabascan leader Franklin Madros, Sr. was born in Interior Alaska. He was a chief of his people and served as mayor of Kaltag. He was active in the Tanana Chiefs Conference. His leadership included bringing new businesses and modern services to his village. Madros was known for traditional storytelling and singing. He passed away in 2006 after battling cancer.

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

This Week In History During this week in 1953, Olympic champion and great all-around Sac and Fox athlete Jim Thorpe died from a heart attack at the age of 66

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

On this day in 1933, author, lawyer and champion of American Indian rights Vine Deloria, Jr., was born. He was well known for his book "Custer Died For Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto."

Monday, March 25, 2013

On this day in 1990, actor Kiowa Gordon was born. He's from the Hualapai Tribe in Arizona. Gordon was part of the wolf pack in the vampire film series Twilight. One of his recent projects includes playing a military private in the movie The Projectionist set for release this year.

Friday, March 22, 2013

During this week in 2007, the first National Native HIV-AIDS Awareness Day was held across the United States to encourage testing and provide information about the disease.

Thursday, March 21, 2013

During this month in 1861, Mohawk poet Emily Pauline Johnson was born on the Six Nations reserve in Canada.

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

During this month in 2011, Alaska Native musher John Baker won the Iditarod sled dog race from Anchorage to Nome. He became the first Iditarod champion from Northwest Alaska and the first Inupiat winner.

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

On this day in 1933, Tommy Solomon died after an illness and heart failure. Hes said to be the last full-blooded Moriori of the Chatham Islands off New Zealand. Solomon dropped out of school at the age of 13 and became a skilled farmer and racehorse breeder.

Monday, March 18, 2013

During this month in 1998, Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond from the Muskeg Lake Cree Nation was appointed as a judge to the Saskatchewan Provincial Court. Shes considered to be the First Treaty Indian appointed to the bench in that Canadian province. Shes taught law at different universities and has focused on Aboriginal and youth issues. Turpel-Lafonds many recognitions include twice being named one of the 100 Global Leaders of Tomorrow by Time Magazine.

Friday, March 15, 2013

During this month in 2009, the International Indian Treaty Council honored Carrie Dann and Manny Pino for their work to protect sacred sites. They were awarded during a sacred places symposium in San Francisco, California.

Thursday, March 14, 2013

During this week in 1907, Chaco Canyon National Monument was established to preserve and protect pueblo ruins in New Mexico. It was later expanded and designated a National Historical Park.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

During this month in 2012, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service issued a permit to members of the Northern Arapaho Tribe to kill, or capture and release, two live bald eagles for religious purposes. The first-of-its-kind permit was controversial and challenged by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe. The two tribes share a reservation. The Northern Arapaho Tribe has taken issue with the permit because it can't be used on the Wyoming reservation.

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

During this week in 2012, Oklahoma lawmakers passed a bill regarding a cabinet level Indian affairs position. A 2011 law eliminated the Oklahoma Indian Affairs Commission and created the executive branch job. Legislation was later signed into law and the governor appointed a liaison.

Monday, March 11, 2013

During this week in 1978, Congress returned Zuni Salt Lake to the Zuni Tribe in New Mexico. The salt is used as seasoning and for ceremonial purposes by the pueblo and other tribes in the Southwest.

Friday, March 8, 2013

During this month in 1891, Congress set aside land for the Annette Island Reserve in Southeast Alaska for Tsimshian people who immigrated there from Canada.

Thursday, March 7, 2013

During this month in 2011, the online search engine Google added the Cherokee language as an interface option. The language was added to Gmail in 2012. The Cherokee Nation has praised the additions as tools in language preservation efforts.

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

During this week in 1951, Army Captain Raymond Harvey led an attack during the Korean War. The Chickasaw man charged through enemy fire taking down machine gun nests when his company was pinned down. He was wounded, but refused evacuation until the mission was complete. He received the Medal of Honor for his actions.

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

On this day in 1980, Jay Silverheels who played Tonto in the television series "The Lone Ranger" passed away in Los Angeles, California at the age of 67. He was from the Six Nations Reserve in Canada.

Monday, March 4, 2013

During this week in 2008, a White House ceremony was held for a Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate war hero. Army Master Sergeant Woodrow Wilson Keeble posthumously received the Medal of Honor. His family, lawmakers and other guests honored him for his heroic actions in the Korean War. Family members and lawmakers worked for years on the award, which he was twice recommended for.

Friday, March 1, 2013

During this month in 1865, the Colorado River Indian Reservation was established. The reservation spans the Colorado River and has land in Arizona and California. Its home to four different tribes.

Thursday, February 28, 2013

During this month in 2012, the Oglala Sioux Tribe sued beer makers and stores in Whiteclay, Nebraska over alcoholism and associated problems on its nearby South Dakota reservation. The suit was later dismissed by a federal judge. Millions of cans of beer are said to be sold in the small town a year.

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

On this day in 1973, Oglala Lakota people and followers of the American Indian Movement seized and occupied the town of Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge reservation. They called on the federal government to honor treaties. The incident drew international attention as it turned into a 71-day standoff with federal agents.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

During this month in 2012, the Vatican announced Kateri Tekakwitha would be canonized as a Catholic saint.

Monday, February 25, 2013

During this month in 2007, Chief Illiniwek danced his last dance during the University of Illinois men's basketball game. The school's controversial mascot was dropped more than two years after being named "hostile and abusive" by the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

Friday, February 22, 2013

During this week in 1941, Cree singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie was born. The Native woman is known for her protest and love songs as well as, being an educator, artist and advocate for Indigenous people.

Thursday, February 21, 2013

The first tribal and bilingual newspaper published in the United States turns 185 years old. The first edition of the Cherokee Phoenix was printed on February 21, 1828 in New Echota, Georgia. It was printed in English and Cherokee, using the Cherokee syllabary. Today the paper is published in Tahlequah, Oklahoma and circulated nationwide. It also has a website featuring multimedia pieces and a radio show.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

During this week in 1998, the First Americans In the Arts Awards ceremony was held in Beverly Hills, California. One honor went to the Performing Arts Department of the American Indian Community House for supporting Native American performers. The event also recognized Indigenous people in film, music, television and dance.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

On this day in 1858, Chief Leschi was hanged in Washington for the murder of an American soldier. The Nisqually leaders lawyer argued that he did not kill the soldier and the death was during warfare. He was tried twice before being sentenced. His people considered it an unfair prosecution. More than a century later, he was exonerated in a retrial.

Monday, February 18, 2013

On this day in 1879, Native American baseball player Louis Leroy was born. The pitcher played at Haskell Indian School and Carlisle Indian School. Leroys professional career included pitching for the New York Highlanders and the Boston Red Sox. According to the Society for American Baseball Research, after the major leagues, he played some semi-pro ball in Wisconsin where he also farmed and became involved in tribal affairs of the Stockbridge-Munsee. He died of cancer in 1944.

Friday, February 15, 2013

On this day in 1946, Santee Sioux actor, poet and recording artist John Trudell was born.

Thursday, February 14, 2013

On this day in 2002, Michael Petoskey from the Grand Traverse Band was appointed as chief judge for the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi.

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

On this day in 1998, the Colorado River Native Nations Alliance and environmentalists protested a proposed nuclear waste dump in Ward Valley, California. They occupied the area for more than 100 days and claimed victory when the Bureau of Land Management halted the project.

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

On this day in 1974, federal judge George Boldt issued a ruling reaffirming fishing rights of Washington tribes. The case became known as the Boldt Decision. Prior to the ruling, tribes held fish-ins to reassert their fishing rights that were established in the 1800s by the federal government. The Boldt Decision led to tensions between tribal and non-tribal fishermen. It was also held up in later court decisions.

Monday, February 11, 2013

On this day in 2008, the Longest Walk II started in California to raise awareness about Native American rights and environmental issues. Walkers covered more than twenty four states and thirty five tribal nations across the country. It ended in July in Washington, D.C.

Friday, February 8, 2013

During this week in 2009, First Lady Michelle Obama visited the Interior Department. She told Indian Affairs employees that they have a partner in the White House. The event included a honor song played by an inter-tribal drum group. The First Lady was also presented a shawl.

Thursday, February 7, 2013

On this day in 2012, an online petition began after a 12-year-old Menominee girl was punished for speaking her Native language at a Catholic school in Wisconsin. The girls family received what they thought was a generic letter of apology and felt that a more personal one was needed. As a result, the schools principal sent letters home with students apologizing for the perception of cultural discrimination and advised that the school would promote cultural diversity through awareness programs.

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

On this day in 1976, Leonard Peltier was arrested and extradited from Canada to face charges for his involvement in the killing of two FBI agents on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota. The Anishinabe and Lakota man was tried and convicted. He has been in prison for more than three decades. Currently in a Florida prison, Peltier continues to claim unjust imprisonment and has been seeking clemency for years.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

During this month in 2008, then-Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd apologized to the country's Aboriginal people for past wrongs caused by the government. Aboriginal leaders have since called on the federal government to back the apology up with efforts to improve Indigenous communities. This week, an Aboriginal group called on Prime Minister Julia Gillard to address the high incarceration rates of Aboriginal people and violence against Indigenous victims.

Monday, February 4, 2013

During this month in 2011, thousands of Canadians became eligible to receive Indian status after a change in legislation. The change allowed for eligibility for certain benefits like health and education. Descendants were denied status because their grandmothers married non-Indians.

Friday, February 1, 2013

During this month in 1885, the Lumbee were recognized as an Indian tribe by North Carolina. The tribe has sought federal recognition status for more than a century.


Thursday, January 31, 2013

On this day in 1870, Mission Indian reservations were established by executive order in the Mission Tule Agency in Southern California. 22 reserves with nearly 300 square miles were created for tribes. The boundaries were later rescinded by President Grant due to public outcry in San Diego County.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

On this day in 1838, Chief Osceola died in a South Carolina prison. The Seminole leader is known among his people as a legendary warrior who masterminded successful battles against five U.S. generals. According to the Seminole Tribe of Florida, Osceola is the subject of numerous myths and at the time of his death was the most famous American Indian.

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

On this day in 1863, as many as 500 Shoshone men, women and children perished in the Bear River Massacre. Colonel Patrick Edward Connor led members of the U.S. Army's Third California Volunteers in the attack in present day Franklin County, Idaho. The Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation holds an annual memorial at the site.

Monday, January 28, 2013

During this month in 1962, the U.S. Interior Department approved the Miccosukee Constitution and the tribe was officially recognized as the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida.

Friday, January 25, 2013

On this day in 1968, the U.S. Indian Claims Commission decreed that Mescalero Apaches in New Mexico should receive more than eight million dollars for lands taken from them in the 1800s. They declined because the money could not be shared with other Apache bands. A future ruling changed that.

Thursday, January 24, 2013

During this week in 2010, Alaska Natives were the first to be counted in the U.S. Census. The Census Bureau began the count in rural Alaska villages, not linked by roads, in the winter while the ground was still frozen to reach villagers by snow machine or dogsled.

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

During this week in 1925, Maria Tallchief, the first Native American ballerina was born in Oklahoma. The Osage woman?s career included performances around the world. She was also the prima ballerina for the New York City Ballet.

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

During this month in 2009, the State-Tribal Collaboration Act was introduced in the New Mexico legislature to improve the government-to-government relationship with the state's 22 tribes. The act included appointing a tribal liaison to every cabinet level agency and requiring the governor to hold an annual summit with tribal leaders. The bill was signed into law less than two months later.

Monday, January 21, 2013

On this day in 2008, the last fluent speaker of the Eyak language died. Honorary Chief Marie Smith Jones passed away in her sleep in Anchorage, Alaska. She was 89-years-old. The Eyak Language Project, which documents, preserves and distributes learning materials, launched a website in 2011 to help people learn the language through weekly words and help from linguistic experts.

Friday, January 18, 2013

On this day in 1958, hundreds of Lumbee tribal members broke up a Ku Klux Klan rally in North Carolina. Armed with weapons, they chased the KKK from Lumbee country and stopped them from spreading their message of hate.

Thursday, January 17, 2013

On this day in 1888, Cree Chief Big Bear died. He?s remembered among his people as a leader who fought Canadian colonialism. Big Bear refused to sign a treaty until he was forced to due to the starvation of his people. Before his death, Big Bear was held responsible for a rebellion and sent to prison. He was released early due to poor health. A memorial for the leader was dedicated in the 1990s on the Poundmaker Cree Nation in Saskatchewan.

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

On this day in 1839, nearly 700 Cherokee people arrived in present-day Oklahoma, as part of their forced removal from the east.

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

During this month in 2003, a repatriation ceremony was held for the remains of Taino people removed from their graves in 1915. The Smithsonian Institution returned the remains of seven Taino people to their descendants in Cuba.

Monday, January 14, 2013

During this month in 2008, U.S. District Judge James Robertson ruled in favor of plaintiffs in the historic Cobell Indian trust class-action lawsuit over the federal government's mismanagement of individual trust accounts. A settlement in the more than a decade old case was finalized last year and the first round of payments were sent out.

Friday, January 11, 2013

During this week in 1934, author, activist and professor Jack Forbes was born. He was a founder of Native American studies at the University of California, Davis and was influential in establishing similar programs at other universities. Forbes helped open the tribal college D-Q University, which later faced troubled times including losing accreditation. The Powhatan and Lenape man died in 2011.

Thursday, January 10, 2013

During this week in 2010, the first Native American Roman Catholic Bishop passed away after an illness. For more than two decades, Donald Pelotte served the Diocese of Gallup, New Mexico, which includes the Navajo reservation. The Abenaki Indian developed training programs for Native American deacons and lay ministers.

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

During this week in 2012, a public memorial was held in Window Rock, Arizona for Navajo Code Talker Keith Little. Little joined the Marines at age 17 and served in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He was leader of the Navajo Code Talkers Association and spent much time raising money for a museum project. Little died after battling an illness at the age of 87.

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

During this week in 1923, Ira Hayes was born. He became famous for helping raise the U.S. flag during World War II.

Monday, January 7, 2013

During this week in 2012, Maryland Governor Martin O?Malley signed two Executive Orders recognizing Indian status for two groups. The Piscataway Indian Nation and the Piscataway Conoy Tribe became the first state recognized tribes in Maryland history.

Friday, January 4, 2013

During this week in 2001, Washington State?s Chinook tribe gained federal recognition.

Thursday, January 3, 2013

During this week in 1943, Richard West was born. West is the founding director of the National Museum of the American Indian. He resigned in 2007, after serving as director for 17 years. West, who was born on January 6th, is a member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma.

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

During this week in 2010, Stacy Phelps, a 1996 mechanical engineering graduate, was the recipient of a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring. Phelps of the Oglala Lakota College received the award during a ceremony held on January 6th at the White House.

Tuesday, January 1, 2013

During this month in 1975, the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act was signed into law to give tribes authority over federal programs.

Monday, December 31, 2012

During this month in 2007, the Ontario government announced it was returning the Ipperwash Provincial Park to the Kettle and Stony Point First Nation. The land was taken to build a military training camp during World War II.

Friday, December 28, 2012

During this week in 1890, the Wounded Knee Massacre occurred with more than 100 Lakota people killed by US soldiers. This event would go on to symbolize the wrongs inflicted on Native Americans by the US government.

Thursday, December 27, 2012

During this week in 1835, Seminole leader Osceola led his forces in the battle of Withlacoochee in Florida. The Seminole conflicts with the U-S government included fighting policy of forced removal from their homelands to Oklahoma.

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

On this day in 1862, 38 Santee Sioux men where hanged in Mankato, Minnesota. President Abraham Lincoln ordered the mass execution. Lincoln also pardoned other Dakotas sentenced to hang in the wake of the Dakota Uprising.

Tuesday, December 25, 2012

During this month in 1971, federal legislation was approved to help fund Navajo Nation?s higher education needs.

Monday, December 24, 2012

During this month in 1980, Chaco Canyon National Monument was re-named to Chaco Culture National Historical Park. An additional 13,000 acres were added to the New Mexico park. The canyon has ties to several southwest tribes.

Friday, December 21, 2012

During this month in 1985, legislation was passed to determine eligibility to Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools.

Thursday, December 20, 2012

During this month in 1973, the Menominee Restoration Act was signed by President Richard Nixon. The Wisconsin tribe's recognition was terminated by the federal government nearly 20 years earlier.

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

During this month in 2000, legislation was signed into law to authorize the president to award Congressional Medals to the original 29 Navajo Code Talkers for their efforts in World War II.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

During this month in 2011, Heather Purser received the Seattle Human Rights Award from the city?s human rights commission. The Squamish woman was honored for her advocacy for the LGBT community.

Monday, December 17, 2012

During this week in 1980, the Hoopa Valley Indian Tribe's radio station went on the air. Located in Hoopa, California, its mission is to promote and project Hoopa tribal culture. The station?s programming includes music, news and information.

Friday, December 14, 2012

During this week in 2007, a ceremony was held in South Dakota to cleanse personal items of Sitting Bull. The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History returned a pair of leggings and a lock of hair to descendants of the Lakota leader.

Thursday, December 13, 2012

During this month in 1531, Juan Diego, a Nahua man in Mexico, accounted seeing an apparition of a woman, known today by Catholics as Our Lady of Guadalupe. The appearance prompted the conversions of many Native people to the Catholic religion.

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

During this month in 1854, the Treaty of Medicine Creek was signed, which created three reservations for Northwest tribes.

Tuesday, December11, 2012

On this day in 1830, the last ruler of the Kamehameha dynasty of the Kingdom of Hawaii was born. Kamehameha V became king in 1863. He respected the culture of his ancestors and encouraged the revival of traditional Hawaiian practices. The leader died on the same day of his birth in 1872. He’s remembered for restoring power to local chiefs.

Monday, December 10, 2012

During this month in 2010, President Obama announced the U.S. would support the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Friday, December 7, 2012

During this month in 1980, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 19-cent stamp honoring Sequoyah, the inventor of the Cherokee syllabary.

Thursday, December 6, 2012

During this month in 1882, the Hopi reservation was created in Arizona.

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

During this week in 2010, President Obama signed the Cobell settlement into law. The 3.4 billion dollar settlement addresses the federal government?s mismanagement of individual Indian trust accounts. The settlement was finalized last month.

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

During this month in 1991, the Custer Monument was renamed the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. It?s located in Montana at the site of the 1876 Battle of the Little Bighorn between Native people and the United States.

Tuesday, December 3, 2012

During this week in 1969, the Choctaw Community News was first published. It?s a tribal publication of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians.

Friday, November 30, 2012

On this day in 1952, Charles George saved the lives of his fellow Army soldiers by jumping on a grenade during the Korea War. The Cherokee man was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

Thursday, November 29, 2012

During this week in 2011, the U.S. Mint unveiled the design for the 2012 Native American $1 Coin. The theme ?Trade Routes in the 17th Century,? features the design of a Native American and horses to signify the historical spread of the horse. By law, the coin must feature annual changes of the reverse design to celebrate the contributions made by tribes and individuals to the United States and its history.

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

During this month in 2009, Yaqui Indians in Mexico buried remains after an effort to get them back from a New York Museum. U.S. anthropologist took the remains a century earlier from a massacre site.

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

On this day in 2000, the Voice of the Yakama Nation went on the air. KYNR is located in Toppenish, Washington. The station airs national and local programing and broadcasts from powwows, round dances, and school sporting events.

Monday, November 26, 2012

During this month in 2010, Navajo Code Talkers Highway was dedicated in New Mexico. A stretch of Highway 264 near the community of Yah-Ta-Hey was named in their honor. Navajo Code Talkers, and tribal and state officials were among those to attend a dedication ceremony.

Friday, November 23, 2012

During this week in 1972, the Aleutian-Pribilof Islands Association, the nonprofit for the Aleut Region in Alaska, was officially incorporated.

Thursday, November 22, 2012

During this month in 2009, at a reconciliation ceremony in New York, the Collegiate Church officially apologized to Lenape people for past mistreatments. The church was started by Dutch settlers in the 1600s. The ceremony took place in front of the National Museum of the American Indian in Lower Manhattan.

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

During this month in 2010, Canada formally endorsed the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The country voted against the declaration when it was adopted by the General Assembly in 2007.

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

During this month in 2011, Michael Cotter, U.S. Attorney for Montana, announced the creation of the Native Shield Initiative. It was designed to help protect Native women in Montana from physical and sexual violence.

Monday, November 19, 2012

During this month in 2011, Kansas Governor Sam Brownback issued a proclamation apologizing to tribes in the state for past mistreatments including forced relocation. It was part of events commemorating 150 years of statehood. Tribes at the signing ceremony accepted the apology and hoped it would improve government-to-government relationships.

Friday, November 16, 2012

During this month in 1978, the Indian Child Welfare Act was enacted to help keep Native children with Native families.

Thursday, November 15, 2012

During this week in 1990, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act was signed into law. NAGPRA provides a process for museums and federal agencies to return certain Native American sacred items, human remains, and cultural and funerary objects to tribes.

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

On this day in 1908, Dr. Walter Soboleff was born in Alaska. The Tlingit man was a pastor, scholar, translator and held various leadership positions. He passed away last year at age 102.

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

During this month in 1871, the San Carlos Apache reservation in Arizona Territory was established.

Monday, November 12, 2012

During this month in 1998, Native veterans were honored by the U.S. Department of Defense. A ceremony featured performances by Alaska veterans and a special tribute to Navajo Code Talkers.

Friday, November 9, 2012

During this week in 2009, President Obama and his cabinet held a historic meeting with tribal leaders in Washington, D.C. to address issues facing their communities.

Thursday, November 8, 2012

During this week in 1967, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Public Broadcasting Act. Native public media like stations and programing have become an essential source of news and information across Indian Country.

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

On this day in 1922, Alaska Native leader Eben Hopson was born. He helped with the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act and the creation of the North Slope Borough and Inuit Circumpolar Conference.

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

On this day in 2011, an inauguration ceremony was held for Bill John Baker. After a long election process, which included a recount and second election, Baker became principal chief of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma.

Monday, November 5, 2012

During this month in 2005, the Canadian government announced its two billion dollar compensation plan to former students of Indian residential schools for physical, mental and sexual abuses they suffered. The government sent out checks, made an official apology and established a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to document the experiences of students.

Friday, November 2, 2012

During this month in 1944, the National Congress of American Indians was established.

Thursday, November 1, 2012

During this week in 1968, the U.S. Post Office issued a six-cent stamp of Nez Perce leader Chief Joseph.

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

During this month in 2006, board members of the Tomah School District in Wisconsin voted to retire its Indian mascot and logo. The decision came after the state?s Department of Public Instruction urged schools to drop such mascots. Schools in the district are now home of the Timberwolves.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

During this month in 1988, the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act was passed by Congress. It established federal regulations for gaming and protects gaming as a means of generating tribal revenue.

Monday, October 29, 2012

During this month in 1949, the Effigy Mounds in Iowa were designated as a National Monument. More than one-thousand-year-old mounds are found throughout the park in the shapes of mammals, birds and reptiles. They were built by eastern woodland tribes.

Friday, October 26, 2012

During this month in 1913, Benny Benson was born. At the age of 13, the Aleut boy designed the flag of Alaska. He won a contest with his design, which depicts the Big Dipper and the North Star-eight stars of gold on a field of blue.

Thursday, October 25, 2012

During this week in 2011, University of Manitoba President David Barnard apologized for Canada?s Indian residential schools. Barnard said while post-secondary institutions didn?t fund or operate them, the university failed to recognize and challenge the Indian Residential School system. Many students claimed abuse at the schools.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

During this week in 2011, U.S. Alaska Senator Mark Begich held a listening session for veterans during the Alaska Federation of Native Annual Convention in Anchorage. Native veterans pressed U.S. lawmakers and a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs official for help. Veterans from across the state voiced concerns, which included the need for housing and services for physical and mental health care. Veterans living in rural areas said they don?t have access to VA services and have to fly to Anchorage, which is costly.

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

This Day In History On this day in 1823, Creek Chief William McIntosh attempted to bribe Cherokee leaders with $12,000 in hopes of convincing them to cede lands to the United States. McIntosh was representing the United States Indian Commissioners. The Cherokee, however, refused the bribe.

Monday, October 22, 2012

During this week in 2002, plaintiffs in the case “Trapp v. DuBois” accepted an offer to institute a sweat lodge in three Massachusetts prisons. The case centered on Native American religious and spiritual freedom in prison..

Friday, October 19, 2012

During this week in 1992, Guatemalan Indigenous rights activist Rigoberta Menchu won the Nobel Peace Prize.

Thursday, October 18, 2012

During this month in 2007, a world Indigenous summit was held in Mexico. The Zapatista National Liberation Army and other groups called for unity among the world's Indigenous people.

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

During this month in 2010, Hopi Code Talker Rex Pooyouma died. He was one of ten Hopi men who used their Native language to send messages during World War II.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

On this day in 2011, Eloise Cobell, the lead plaintiff of the class action lawsuit Cobell vs. Salazar died after battling cancer. The Blackfeet woman led the more than a decade long legal battle against the federal government over mismanagement of individual Indian trust accounts. The suit ended with a more than three billion dollar settlement.

Monday, October 15, 2012

During this month in 2010, President Obama signed into law the Indian Veterans Housing Opportunity Act. It made changes to certain Native American housing assistance programs including fixing a flaw in a housing law, which lawmakers said disadvantaged Native veterans.

Friday, October 12, 2012

On this day in 1964, Oglala Lakota athlete Billy Mills stunned the world with his Olympic victory. He won the 10-thousand meter run in Tokyo. His breathtaking "come-from-behind-finish" has been called the most sensational race in Olympic history by several news accounts. Mills currently serves as the national spokesperson for Running Strong for American Indian Youth.

Thursday, October 11, 2012

During this week in 2009, the White House Office of National AIDS Policy held a meeting with American Indians and Alaska Natives. The HIV/AIDS discussion took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico to provide the public a chance to give input on a national HIV/AIDS strategy.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

During this month in 2011, U.S. Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski held a field hearing on Alaska Native youth suicide. The hearing in Anchorage examined factors often surrounding suicide like depression, violence and lack of support. Witnesses included tribal, federal and health officials. A community dialog was held after the hearing.

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

On this day in 1987, Seminole Chief James E. Billie was acquitted of state charges for killing an endangered panther. Billie killed, skinned and ate the panther in Florida, nearly four years earlier. He argued religious freedom and treaty rights.

Monday, October 8, 2012

During this week in 1966, award-winning author Sherman Alexie was born. The Spokane-Coeur d'Alene writer of ?The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven? debuted a new book last week entitled "Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories?.

Friday, October 5, 2012

During this month in 2003, the Navajo Nation Council confirmed During this month in 2003, the Navajo Nation Council confirmed Claudeen Bates Arthur as Chief Justice of the tribe's Supreme Court. Arthur was a pioneer in the legal field for Navajo women, and the first woman to lead the Navajo Nation's judicial system. She passed away in 2004 of pancreatic cancer at the age of 62.

Thursday, October 4, 2012

During this month in 2009, the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana lost its decades long federal recognition fight. The Bureau of Indian Affairs denied the tribe status after a more than 30-year wait. The tribe continues to seek federal status. Last year, the tribe went before the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. Tribal leaders are concern about the state of current legislation in Congress because of the upcoming election.

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

During this week in 1962, the Institute of American Indian Arts opened in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The tribal college offers four-year fine arts degrees. The Institute is celebrating 50 years with an open house next week, which includes panel sessions, campus tours and storytelling.

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

During this month in 2011, the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe and Colorado?s State Historic Preservation Office signed a cultural resources management plan. The first-of-its-kind agreement included helping build a website and database for records, surveying and other cultural resources work.

Monday, October 1, 2012

During this week in 2011, the first woman chief of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians was sworn in. Phyliss Anderson took the oath of office during a ceremony on the tribe?s reservation in Mississippi. Anderson is fluent in the Choctaw language and has more than two decades of experience with tribal government including serving on the tribal council and as secretary-treasurer.

Friday, September 28, 2012

On the fourth Friday in September annually, California celebrates Native American Day. In 1968, California Governor Ronald Reagan signed a resolution designating the fourth Friday in September as American Indian Day. The California State Assembly enacted legislation in the 90s creating the day as an official state holiday.

Thursday, September 27, 2012

On this day in 1971, the Tanana Chiefs Conference was officially incorporated. It works on behalf of 42 villages in Interior Alaska.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

During this month in 2004, the National Museum of the American Indian opened its doors in Washington, D.C.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

During this month in 2011, public meetings to discuss missing and murdered Aboriginal women were held in several communities in northern British Columbia, Canada. The Missing Women Commission held the forums, which included addressing cases on a stretch of road between Prince Rupert and Prince George known as the ?Highway of Tears.? People called for a special Amber Alert and a public shuttle.

Monday, September 24, 2012

During this month in 2011, the New York State Senate Select Committee on State-Native American Relations held its inaugural meeting in Albany. The committee was formed to improve the government-to-government relationship between nine tribes and the state. The first ever meeting addressed economic development and challenges. It included representatives of the Oneida, Seneca and St. Regis Mohawk tribes.

Friday, September 21, 2012

During this month in 1956, the federal government began restoring tribal ownership of a large number of scattered lots on the Flathead reservation in Montana to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.

Thursday, September 20, 2012

During this week in 2004, Lummi people presented totem poles to the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. as a gesture of unity and support to the families of the nearly 200 people who died there during the September 11th attacks. The Liberty and Freedom totem poles with the Sovereignty crossbar remained at the Pentagon for a few days before moving to the Congressional Cemetery and then to its permanent home at the 9/11 Memorial Grove. The poles feature bears and eagles and are painted red, white, black and yellow. The Lummi carvers had also gifted poles in honor of World Trade Center Victims in New York and those in the Pennsylvania crash.

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

During this month in 2011, a totem pole carved with stories of healing, hope and knowledge traveled from Washington State, through tribal communities, to Maryland. The healing totem, made by a Lummi carver, was created for an exhibit at the Library of Medicine to examine concepts of health and medicine among Native people. The Library hoped the totem?s journey would increase awareness of good health and health information resources.

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

During this week in 1778, Delaware people, also known as Lenape, signed a treaty with the United States. They were among the first Indians to come in contact with Europeans in the early 1600s. Their traditional territory was on the East Coast, but many were forced to move westward through a handful of states. Some groups settled in present day Oklahoma and others fled to Canada.

Monday, September 17, 2012

During this week in 2011, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe held a groundbreaking ceremony for its tribal veterans cemetery near Mission, South Dakota. The tribe received a first-of-its-kind grant by the U.S. Veterans Affairs Department for the project.

Friday, September 14, 2012

During this month in 2011, regional broadcasts of the "Lakota Berenstain Bears" aired on public television in North and South Dakota. Voices were featured from the Standing Rock, Rosebud, Pine Ridge and Cheyenne River reservations.  20 episodes of the popular children's show were dubbed in Lakota to promote the language among youth.

Thursday, September 13, 2012

During this month in 2011, California Governor Jerry Brown established a tribal advisor position to strengthen communication and collaboration between California state and tribes. Brown issued an Executive Order for the position to serve as a direct link between the governor?s office and tribes on issues including legislation, policy and regulation. Brown signed the order at a tribal alliance meeting in Sacramento, California. Earlier this year, Cynthia Gomez was appointed as advisor.

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

During this week in 1989, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 28-cent stamp honoring Sitting Bull. The portrait of the Lakota leader was based on photographs from Smithsonian Institution archives.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

During this week in 2011, pueblo historian Dr. Joe Sando from Jemez Pueblo passed away. He was a noted scholar and author of several books. Sando was also a consultant and lecturer with a rich knowledge of New Mexico?s 19 pueblos. He died of natural causes at 88-years-old. An event was held last October at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque to celebrate his life.

Monday, September 10, 2012

During this month in 1917, the Cocopah Indian Reservation was established by executive order. More than 1,000 acres were set aside for the reservation. The Cocopah Indian Tribe?s reservation is now more than 6,000 acres and includes a casino, resort, golf course and a speedway near Yuma, Arizona. According to the tribe?s website, visitors can enjoy activities while learning about the tribe's culture and taking in the great scenic beauty of the region.

Friday, September 7, 2012

During this week in 2011, imprisoned Anishinabe-Lakota activist, Leonard Peltier, was awarded the Mario Benedetti Foundation?s International Human Rights Prize. The foundation supports human rights causes and cultural preservation. Peltier who is serving two consecutive life terms for his involvement in the shooting of two FBI agents during the 1970?s Wounded Knee conflict, turns 68 on September 12th.

Thursday, September 6, 2012

During this month in 2008, the fifth Commemorative Caravan on the Trail of Death was held. The event commemorates the 1838 journey of Potawatomi people removed by the U.S. government from Indiana and forced to march to Kansas. Many people died during the march, which lasted over a two months period. The commemorative event follows a trail, which includes historical markers and highway signs.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

During this week in 2011, the Fond du Lac community radio station went on the air. WGZS is one of four Native-owned radio stations in Minnesota. The 50,000-watt station plays a variety of music and news and information shows.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

During this week in 2010, the Piapot First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada honored its famous chief and the 135th anniversary of Treaty Four. Chief Piapot, who signed the treaty, was known to be a brave warrior, but also a peaceful negotiator who championed the rights of his people. Three days of celebrations included the unveiling of a statue and an orchestra performance.

Monday, September 3, 2012

During this week in 2011, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor met with Native people in New Mexico. The Leadership Institute at the Santa Fe Indian School hosted her visit. Her trip included touring pueblos and speaking with students at the Santa Fe Indian School. The Institute invited the justice to visit pueblos to hear from community members and see how leaders govern their nations. She also made a stop in Albuquerque at the University of New Mexico Law School and a meeting with Native American Community Academy students.

Friday, August 31, 2012

On this day in 1916, Chief Aurelius Piper of the Golden Hill Paugussett Indian Nation was born. Known as Chief Big Eagle, he was the hereditary leader of the Connecticut tribe from 1959 until his death in 2008. He was an advocate for Native rights, worked to preserve tribal land and was a foreign correspondent.

Thursday, August 30, 2012

On this day in 2010, the Notah Begay III Foundation announced the names of 14 Native youth to help with the NB3 golf challenge to give them experience with golf tournaments. The event raises money for the foundation?s work on Native youth health and wellness.

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

During this month in 1838, the first of 13 Cherokee detachments left under their own supervision from the southeastern United States to Indian Territory in Oklahoma. Previous groups had left under military supervision during the forced removal process by the U.S. government. According to the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma?s Cultural Resource Center, about 14,000 Cherokee people were forced to walk or board boats for the trip. About 2,000 died of starvation, disease and exposure. Their journey became known as the Trail of Tears.

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

During this month in 2009, Dr. Joseph Medicine Crow received the Medal of Freedom. The Crow man received America's highest civilian honor from President Obama at a White House ceremony. Medicine Crow was awarded for his service in World War II and his many cultural contributions. Among his many honors and recognitions are the Bronze Star and the French Legion of Honor.

Monday, August 27, 2012

On this day, Shawnee-Cayuga poet and writer Barney Bush was born in Illinois. His poetry books include “My Horse and a Jukebox,” “Petroglyphs” and “Inherit the Blood.” He’s also recognized by the Society of Artists, Composers and Editors of Music in Paris, France. Bush turns 65 today.

Friday, August 24, 2012

During this month in 2003, the National Park Service turned over three centuries old buffalo hide shields to the Navajo Nation. They were found in Utah in the 1920s hidden in a rock crevice. The Navajo Nation and other tribes filed a claim under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act to recover the items, which had been on display at Capitol Reef Nation Park. The Navajo Nation claimed the shields were sacred objects needed by traditional religious leaders to practice of the Protection Way ceremony. The tribe claimed they were made by Many Goat White Hair and four other men and used in a battle with the Spanish. After the battle, Many Goat White Hair hid the three shields and prayed that they’d be found in the future.

Thursday, August 23, 2012

During this month in 1986, an Act of Congress restored federal recognition to the Klamath Tribes in Oregon. Government termination policy decades earlier heavily impacted the tribes.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

On this day in 2006, a federal appeals court issued a final decision protecting the rights of Native voters in South Dakota. The American Civil Liberties Union filed the suit Bone Shirt vs. Hazeltine on behalf of four Native Americans in 2001, after the state redrew boundaries. The suit argued the action disenfranchised Indian voters and violated the Voting Rights Act. South Dakota and 16 other states must get federal approval before making changes to their election laws and procedures.

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

On this day in 1957, Seminole people in Florida voted to create a federally recognized tribe in response to U.S. Termination Policy. The vote established a governmental entity called the Seminole Tribe of Florida and a charted corporation to conduct economic development for the tribe. Today, the tribe owns several businesses and has fought for sovereignty and self-determination to retain Seminole language, culture and way of life.

Monday, August 20, 2012

During this week in 1962, the first Klamath Salmon Festival was held on the Yurok reservation in Northern California. The event observes the return of salmon to the Klamath River and celebrates Yurok culture and tradition. It also yields a huge salmon feast. The 50th anniversary was held August 18th, near Klamath, California.

Friday, August 17, 2012

On this day in 1936, Dakota actor, poet, musician and activist, Floyd Red Crow Westerman was born. Westerman recorded songs with Willie Nelson and Buffy Sainte-Marie. His film and television credits include "Dances with Wolves," "Hidalgo," "The X-Files" and "Walker Texas Ranger." Westerman advocated for many Native American issues including testifying in the 1990s at World Uranium Hearings in Austria. He passed away at the age of 71.

Thursday, August 16, 2012

On this day in 1924, Chipeta, the wife, confidant and advisor to Chief Ouray, died at the age of 81. Ouray was the leader of a Ute band in Colorado. The Ute band was removed to Utah where he died and she continued to be a leader.

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

During this month annually, the Santa Fe Indian Market is held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The market began more than 90 years ago and featured work by Native American artisans and craftsmen. It has evolved to include additional events like a Native Cinema Showcase, and live music and dances. About 100,000 people are drawn to the market from around the world, contributing millions of dollars to the local economy.

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

On this day in 1983, Wilma Mankiller became the first female Deputy Chief of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma. She took office with Chief Ross Swimmer. In 1985, Swimmer was nominated for a federal position, which led to Mankiller?s inauguration as the first woman principal chief of the tribe. She served as chief until 1995. Mankiller continued to be a force in tribal affairs and an advocate for American Indians until her death in 2010 after battling cancer.

Monday, August 13, 2012

On this day in 2011, Navajo activist, artist, and musician, Klee Benally, chained himself to construction equipment to protest development by an Arizona ski resort on the San Francisco Peaks. He was arrested and charged with trespassing and disorderly conduct. Benally was found guilty and ordered to do community service with the option of teaching a class on human rights. For years, individuals and tribes have been fighting development on the San Francisco Peaks, a site considered sacred to many tribes.

Friday, August 10, 2012

During this week in 1680, Ohkay Owingeh leader Po'pay led the Pueblo Revolt. Tribes in the Southwest successfully fought against Spanish colonists to protect their way of life and culture.

Thursday, August 9, 2012

On this day in 1908, Mary Ross was born. She was the great, great granddaughter of Cherokee Nation Chief John Ross and an aerospace pioneer. Ross was the first female engineer for Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. Her contributions in aerospace technology included areas in space flight and ballistic missiles. After retirement in the 1970s, she became an advocate for more female and Native American science students. Ross was nearly 100-years-old at the time of her death.

Wednesday, August 8, 2012

During this week in 2004, Anthony Black Feather passed away. The Lakota man was a spokesperson for the Teton Sioux Nation Treaty Council and also worked with the United Nations advocating for Indigenous rights. Black Feather was 70-years-old at the time of his death.

Tuesday, August 7, 2012

During this week in 2011, six American Indian students from the University of North Dakota filed a lawsuit to prevent the use of the university?s ?Fighting Sioux? mascot and logo. The students said its use created a hostile environment on campus. Legislation had been passed mandating the use of the ?Fighting Sioux.? The law was later repealed. A judge has thrown out the lawsuit saying the fight appears to be over.

Monday, August 6, 2012

On this day in 2000, Dr. Arthur L. McDonald received the Presidential Citation from the American Psychological Association. The Oglala Sioux man was recognized for bringing awareness and advocating for psychological health in underserved Native communities. He?s considered the first Native American man to earn a PhD in Psychology. McDonald was a faculty member at California School of Professional Psychology where he conducted studies on American Indian college dropouts.

Friday, August 3, 2012

On this date in 2008, Hereditary chief Aurelius Piper, Sr., of the Golden Hill Paw-GUSS-ett Indian Nation, passed away at age 92. Piper was a correspondent with advocates for Native Americans before the International Human Rights Council in Geneva. A spiritual advisor to prisoners, he founded the Native American Prison Project in 1983. For decades, he fought to maintain Connecticut?s 300-year-long recognition of his tribe, and, less successfully, to achieve federal recognition.

Thursday, August 2, 2012

On this date in 2009, Nez Perce tribal member Loretta A. Tuell, received the Margaret Brent Award at the Annual American Bar Association in Chicago, Illinois. The award honors women lawyers who have succeeded in their field and served as positive role models and mentors for other women in law. She co-started the first fully Native American-owned law firm in Washington, D.C. with a Native woman co-founder. In addition to being nominated to numerous law boards and committees, Tuel was appointed Staff Director and Chief Council for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee in February 2011 by Senator Daniel Akaka of Hawaii. She holds a Juris Doctorate from the University of California Los Angeles School of Law.

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

On this date in 2011, the Suquamish Tribal Council in Washington voted to allow same sex marriages on their reservation involving at least one tribal member, making them the second tribe after the 2008 decision of the Coquille Indian Tribe in Oregon to approve same sex marriages.

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

During this week, on August 4th, 2003, Blackfeet and Gros Ventre writer and poet James Welch passed away at his home in Missoula, Montana. Welch is considered a leader of the Native American Renaissance, having written about the complexities of contemporary Native American life in books such as ?Fools Crow,? and ?Indian Lawyer.? Among other honors, he received an American Book Award, an Emmy for a documentary on the Battle of Little Big Horn, the Native Writers Circle Lifetime Achievement award, and the French Knight of the Order of Arts and Letters. Welch was 62.

Monday, July 30, 2012

During this week in 2010, President Obama signed the Tribal Law and Order Act. It brings increased resources for law enforcement to protect Native American victims of sexual and physical assault, and provides for recruitment and training of tribal police. The Tribal Law and Order Act boosts federal assistance in investigating and prosecuting cases. It authorizes tribes to give longer sentences to serious offenders, and provides for substance abuse prevention and treatment programs.

Friday, July 27, 2012

On this date in 1994, the Native American Journalists Association issued a proclamation calling for a halt to the use of Native American nicknames, logos, and mascots for sports teams; an end to the use of the word "fighting" before tribal names; and the use of actual tribal names when referring to Native American tribes. Aimed at news and other media, the statement was issued at the first UNITY Journalists of Color Conference, which was held in Atlanta, Georgia. UNITY members adopted the resolution on July 28, 1994. Six thousand people attended Unity that year, making it the first large gathering of journalists of color. Participants included the Native American Journalists Association, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Association of Black Journalists, and the Asian American Journalists Association. This year's UNITY Conference is being held in Las Vegas, Nevada from August 1st to the 4th.

Thursday, July 26, 2012

On this day in 1971, John Tortes Meyers, a Cahiulla Indian, passed away in San Bernardino, California. Meyers was the first Cahuilla accepted at Dartmouth College in 1909. His athletic abilities caught the attention of major league baseball. He became a catcher for the New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers. His nickname was “Chief” and also “Ironman” for his strength behind the plate. Meyers was considered one of the best catchers in the major leagues.

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

On this day in 1971, John Tortes Meyers, a Cahiulla Indian, passed away in San Bernardino, California. Meyers was the first Cahuilla accepted at Dartmouth College in 1909. His athletic abilities caught the attention of major league baseball. He became a catcher for the New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers. His nickname was ?Chief? and also ?Ironman? for his strength behind the plate. Meyers was considered one of the best catchers in the major leagues.

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Annually in July, the Veterans Administration hosts the American Indian Veterans Gourd Dance at the Raymond G. Murphy V-A Medical Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Traditionally a warrior?s dance among southern plains tribes, organizers say the Gourd Dance brings healing, prayer, and protection to Native American veterans. The 5th annual V-A American Indian Veterans Gourd Dance is coming up Saturday, July 28th.

Monday, July 23, 2012

During this week in 1967, Inupiat and Metis' actress Irene Bedard was born in Anchorage, Alaska. Bedard was nominated for a Golden Globe award for her breakthrough role as Mary Crow Dog in the 1994 television movie ?Lakota Woman: Siege At Wounded Knee.? She?s also known for her roles in ?Smoke Signals,? the voice of Pocahontas in Disney?s Animated Classics series. Bedard starred alongside Cherokee actor Wes Studi in the television series, "Return of the Cherokee," which is being rebroadcast on PBS stations this week. She also guest starred with Studi in a live production of ?Beloved Woman,? playing Nanyehi, the title role.

Friday, July 20, 2012

On this day in 1980, San Ildefonso Pueblo potter Maria Antonia Martinez died. She was in her 90s and was famous for black on black pottery. She?s credited with revitalizing pottery making at her New Mexico pueblo.

Thursday, July 19, 2012

During this week in 1906, The Claremore Progress published a piece about the fate of the Creek Council House because Oklahoma was in the early stages of becoming a state and would have one capital. The Creek Indian capitol was built in Okmulgee in the 1800s and was the center of tribal business. The newspaper piece suggested it be turned into a museum. Years after the publication, the building was ceded to the federal government and later sold to the city. The Muskogee Creek Nation bought the building in 2010.

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

On this day in 1948, Choctaw and Cherokee writer Louis Owens was born in California. Owens was known for writing mystery novels with Native Americans as main characters. He was also a renowned scholar and taught at universities in the U.S. and abroad. His awards and honors included the French Noir for the novel ?The Sharpest Sight? and the American Book Award for ?Nightland.? Owens died in 2002.

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

During this month annually, Pacific Northwest tribes take part in a canoe journey. The tradition of canoeing to neighboring nations to celebrate language, cultural, salmon fishing and canoeing was revived in 1989. The first gathering was called ?Paddle to Seattle.? Today, more than 100 canoes take part in the journey from U.S. tribes, Canadian First Nations and New Zealand. This year?s event is hosted by the Squaxin Island Tribe in Washington State.

Monday, July 16, 2012

On this day in 1979, an earthen dam broke at the United Nuclear Corporation on the Navajo reservation near Church Rock, New Mexico. More than 1,000 tons of uranium mining tailings and 100 million gallons of radioactive water burst from the dam and traveled to the Rio Puerco river. The Church Rock Uranium Spill released more volume of radioactive waste into the environment than any other nuclear accident in U.S. history. Members of the Navajo Nation held a 30-year commemoration in 2009 to remind the public of the accident and to remember the victims who continue to be affected by the disaster.

Friday, July 13, 2012

On this day Comanche actor Gil Birmingham was born in San Antonio, Texas. Birmingham was recently in the lacrosse film “Crooked Arrows” and in the “Twilight” series. He’s also appeared in a number of television movies and series. Birmingham won Outstanding Supporting Role for the TV movie “Dreamkeeper” by the American Indian LA Film and Television Awards. He holds a degree from the University of Southern California in Administration.

Thursday, July 12, 2012

During this week in 1941, Creek and Seminole artist Jerome Richard Tiger was born in Oklahoma. Tiger was a sculptor and painter who won numerous awards. His art’s described as a combination of spiritual vision, humane understanding, and technical virtuosity. He had no formal training and had the ability to create images after a momentary glance. Critics referred to him as the Rembrandt or Goya of Indian art. Tiger died in his 20s from an accidental shooting.

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

During this week in 1762, a Cherokee delegation, as Emissaries of Peace, met with King George III. The delegation met in the Drawing Room at St. James?s Palace in London. Last month, a Cherokee group commemorated the 250th anniversary of the meeting with a trip to England. The tour featured some of the same locations that the original delegation visited. The group included representatives of three federally recognized Cherokee tribes to serve as Ambassadors of Goodwill to Great Britain.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

On this day in 1836, a Creek band was captured. About 900 Creek people were forced to march from Alabama to Oklahoma. Their traditional homeland was in the Southeastern United States. In 1836 and 37, more than 20,000 Creeks were removed to Indian Territory. Some remained in the southeast. The Oklahoma tribe today is the Muscogee Creek Nation.

Monday, July 09, 2012

On this day in 2010, a federal appeals court ruled a Texas school district could not punish a Native American student for wearing his long hair in braids to express his family?s religious beliefs. The kindergarten student in Needville, a town near Houston, was placed in in-school suspension for violating the school district?s dress code requiring boys to have short hair.

Friday, July 06, 2012

On this day in 2010, the film ?The Only Good Indian? was screened in Manhattan, Kansas. The film originally premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival. Set in Kansas in the early 1900s, a Native American boy is taken away from his family and forced to attend boarding school. The boy escapes and a bounty hunter is sent to track him down and return him to school.

Thursday, July 05, 2012

During this week annually, Aboriginal people in Australia celebrate their history, culture and achievements during NAIDOC week. NAIDOC or the National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee holds events across the country. Aboriginal people established the committee in the 1920s to increase awareness of the status and treatment of Indigenous Australians. The 2012 theme is ?Spirit of the Tent Embassy? to celebrate 40 years of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, an advocacy group.

Wednesday, July 04, 2012

During this month in 2004, the National Native American Veterans Association was launched by Air Force and Navy veteran Thomas M. Berry, who's Choctaw. Along with Cherokee Stephanie McCalister, an Air Force Gulf War veteran. Berry saw a need to educate veterans and tribes about the rights and benefits for Native American veterans regardless of tribal affiliation and branch of service. Statistics show Native Americans have the highest military service rates per capita of any ethnic group in the United States.

Tuesday, July 03, 2012

On this day in 2009, three Navajo Code Talkers were honored at Mount Rushmore National Monument in South Dakota. Arthur J. Hubbard Sr., Joe Morris and George B. Willie Sr. were presented with American flags. The event included a flyover by a B-1 bomber plane that carried the flags. Navajo Code Talkers developed a code in their language and used it to transmit messages during World War II.

Monday, July 02, 2012

On this day in 1924, Corporal Mitchell Red Cloud, Jr. was born. The Ho-Chunk-Winnebago man received a posthumous Medal of Honor for his bravery during the Korean War. Red Cloud leaned on a tree for support while firing at the enemy, although he was shot numerous times. He managed to save many of his fellow soldiers by warning them of the advancing enemy and continued to fight while his company moved the severely wounded out of the firing line. In 1999, the USNS Red Cloud was launched in his honor off a dock in San Diego, California. There are also monuments, parks, highways, and other ships named in his honor since he was Killed In Action in November 1950 at the age of 26. Red Cloud was also a Marine veteran of World War Two.

Friday, June 29, 2012

During this week in 1914, Chiracahua Apache artist Allan Houser was born. Houser was a sculptor, painter and stone carver. His work has been exhibited in museums and galleries across the globe. Houser was a recipient of the National Medal of Arts award. He died in 1994.

Thursday, June 28, 2012

On this day in 1993, Rueben Snake died after complications from heart problems. The Winnebago man was vice president of the American Indian Movement and headed the Indian Education Training Program in Albuquerque, New Mexico in the 1970s. Snake was also Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska chairman and president of the National Congress of American Indians. He was instrumental in strengthening the American Indian Religious Freedom Act, which was amended and signed by President Clinton in the ‘90s.

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

During this week in 2011, Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly ordered flags at half-staff to honor a Navajo police officer killed in the line of duty. Sergeant Darrell Curley was a 26-year veteran of the Navajo police force and was on a domestic violence call when he was shot and killed. Curley was posthumously honored earlier this year during National Police Week in Washington, D.C.

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

On this day in 1975, gunfire broke out between members of the American Indian Movement and federal agents on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota. Two agents were killed during the incident. AIM member Leonard Peltier was later convicted and sentenced to two consecutive life terms for the deaths of the agents. The 67-year-old is imprisoned at the Coleman Federal Correctional Complex in Florida. Peltier's next parole hearing is scheduled for 2024.

Monday, June 25, 2012

During this week in 1876, the Battle of the Little Bighorn took place in Montana. On June 25 and 26, more than 200 soldiers, including Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer, died fighting more than a thousand Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho warriors. Today the area is a National Monument and includes an Indian Memorial, which was established in memory of tribes defending their way of life during the battle.

Friday, June 22, 2012

During this week in 2004, Anna Mae Aquash was buried in her homeland in Nova Scotia, Canada. The Mi?kmaq woman was murdered in South Dakota in 1975. Her body was discovered on the Pine Ridge reservation. Her family waited decades for justice and are still seeking more answers about her death. In December 2010, John Graham, a Native man from Canada, was convicted of felony murder for his role in the kidnapping and shooting death of Aquash. Graham and Aquash were said to have been involved in the American Indian Movement at the time of her death. Graham has been sentenced to life in prison. He appealed the decision and the Supreme Court in South Dakota upheld the conviction and life sentence.

Thursday, June 21, 2012

During this week in 1952, Oneida actor Graham Greene was born on the Six Nations reserve in Canada. Greene is well known for his roles in "Dances With Wolves," "Thunderheart," and the recent "Twilight" series. He's also appeared in a number of television series and movies.

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

On this day in 1988, Crow leader Robert Yellowtail passed away at his home at age 98. Yellowtail studied law to become a lawyer, but spent his life involved in tribal affairs. He led a successful fight against Congress to keep reservation lands under tribal control. His long list of accomplishments included helping write the Crow Allotment Act, fighting for citizenship and voting rights, and being appointed as Superintendent of the Crow reservation.

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

During this week in 1865, Susan La Flesche Picotte was born on the Omaha reservation in Nebraska. She was the first American Indian woman to receive a medical degree and was a pioneer in providing health care for American Indians. La Flesche Picotte graduated from the Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania. She returned to Nebraska to provide health care to Omaha people out of a government boarding school. Two years before her death, she helped open a hospital on the reservation. The hospital is now a National Historic Landmark dedicated to her work.

Monday, June 18, 2012

During this week in 2011, the Native American squash blossom became the official necklace of New Mexico. The necklace design resembles the flower of the squash plant and is often made out of silver with turquoise or other gemstones. The necklace joined the list of New Mexico state symbols when the law for the official state necklace went into effect on June 17th.

Friday, June 15, 2012

On this day in 1919, Choctaw Army Colonel Van T. Barfoot was born in Mississippi. He received the Medal of Honor for his bravery during World War II. Barfoot also served in the Korean and Vietnam Wars. Later in life, at age 90, he fought and won the right to fly his flag after a Virginia homeowners association ordered it to be removed. The 92-year-old died earlier this year.

Thursday, June 14, 2012

On this day in 2000, Seminole Chairman James E. Billie and Miccosukee Chairman Billy Cypress kicked off the 16th Annual Native American Journalists Association Convention in Hollywood, Florida. Their address including thanking the journalists for helping make the Native voice heard.

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

During this month in 1961, the American Indian Chicago Conference was held in Chicago, Illinois. The conference brought together hundreds of people from across the country to address the plight of Native America in the early 60s. A declaration was drafted to identify the needs of American Indians like education, health care and water rights.

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

On this day in 1941, traditional healer Hawk Littlejohn was born. The Eastern Band of Cherokee man was best known for crafting flutes. His flutes have been used by various award-winning Native American artists like R. Carlos Nakai and Mary Youngblood. Littlejohn passed away in 2000.

Monday, June 11, 2012

On this day in 2008, then-Prime Minister Stephen Harper official apologized to former students of Indian Residential Schools on behalf of the Canadian Government. For more than a century, Native children attended the church-run, government-funded schools where many were emotionally, physical and sexually abused.

Friday, June 8, 2012

During this month annually, motorcycle enthusiasts from across the Navajo Nation take part in the Long Run Motorcycle Ride to the Bosque Redondo Memorial located at Ft. Sumner, NM. The event was started a few years ago to help commemorate the Navajo Long Walk. Navajo people were removed from their homelands in the 1800s and forced by the U.S. Army to march hundreds of miles to the fort. This year's motorcycle run starts in Kirkland, NM and ends at the memorial.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

On this day in 1954, Native American author Louise Erdrich was born. She?s the author of novels, poetry, short stories, children's books, and a memoir of early motherhood. Her book "The Plague of Doves" was a finalist for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize. Erdrich took a stand against Indian mascots in 2007 by turning down an honorary doctorate degree from the University of North Dakota. She?s from a North Dakota tribe and grew up in the state.

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

On this day in 1950, Vincent Craig was born. The Navajo singer, songwriter and comedian was best known for his humorous songs on reservation life. Craig was the creator of the Mutton Man comic strip and appeared in movies like ?Turquoise Rose? and ?The Blue Gap Boys.? Craig was also a veteran and served with the Navajo police force. He passed away in 2010 after battling cancer.

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

On this day in 1947, Thomas George Prince spoke on behalf of First Nations people to a parliamentary committee about the revision of the Indian Act. Prince is considered to be one of Canada?s most decorated soldiers who served in the Korean War and World War II.

Monday, June 4, 2012

On this day in 1960, Stockbridge-Munsee and Menominee actress and producer Sheila May Tousey was born. One of her first performances onstage was at the University of New Mexico. She has since appeared in movies including ?Thunderheart,? ?Two Grey Hills,? and ?Coyote Waits.?

Friday, June 1, 2012

On this day in 2010, an agreement promoting education for Metis, Inuit, and First Nations in Canada was entered into by the Association of Canadian Deans of Education and Native leaders. The aim of the Accord on Indigenous Education was to reintroduce Indigenous language and culture into the classroom. It also sought to improve the retention rate of Indigenous students across the country.

Thursday, May 31, 2012

On this day in 1796, the Treaty with the Seven Nations of Canada was signed between First Nations and the United States. The treaty included the cession of lands to the State of New York and set aside reservation land for the Mohawks. In recent times, the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe has sough claim over land and has disputed an area the state and county asserted jurisdiction over.

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

On this day in 1650, the New Netherlands "Directors of Council" passed an ordinance against the making of fake wampum, beads made from shell. It was discovered that manufacturers in Europe were making fake beads to pay Native Americans in New England states. Wampum was widely used in trade and for other purposes.

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

During this week in 2009, public hearings to address race relations and concerns of Navajo citizens were held in Torreon and Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission met with community members and city leaders. Navajo people talked about education and healthcare concerns. The commission continues to hold meetings in communities across the Four Corners region and has signed agreements with different cities to address and improve race relations.

Monday, May 28, 2012

During this month in 2011, tribal leaders across the country expressed outrage at the use of the name Geronimo in the U.S. operation that killed Osama bin Laden. The National Congress of American Indians expressed dismay and reflected upon the many lives and sacrifices that Native American service men and women have made to the country. According to NCAI, hundreds of thousands of Native people have served in the military in the last century. The Apache leader Geronimo is one of Indian Country?s most respected leaders.

Friday, May 25, 2012

During this month in 2009, Otoe-Missouria tribal veterans were honored with the War Mothers Memorial in Red Rock, Oklahoma. The tribal chapter of the national organization of War Mothers holds annual events on Memorial Day and Veteran's Day. The chapter is considered to be the first Native American War Mothers chapter in the United States.

Thursday, May 24, 2012

On this day in 2003, Army Private Lori Piestewa was honored in an exhibit at the Women In Military Service for America Memorial. She was the first service woman to die in the Iraq War and is considered to be the first Native American woman to die in combat.

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

On this day in 1923, Navajo Code Talker Alfred Frank Leonard was born in Lukachukai, Arizona. Leonard was one of the "Original 29" Navajo Code Talkers who created an unbreakable code that was used during World War II. Leonard passed away in 1999. The Navajo Code Talkers were silent heroes for 60 years before they were officially recognized with Congressional Medals in 2001.

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

On this day in 1988, a fifteen-foot sculpture was dedicated in honor of the Forest County Potawatomi tribe. The bronze sculpture looks west over the Fox River where they once lived until forced removal from the area in the 1830's. The statue was named "Ekwabet? or "the one who watches over" by tribal elder, religious leader, and language and culture director, Bill Daniels, Jr. A miniature version of the statue is housed in the tribal executive building in Crandon, Wisconsin.

Monday, May 21, 2012

On this day in 1987, Acoma tribal members held a demonstration to oppose the creation of the El Malpais National Monument in western New Mexico. Acoma Pueblo held vested interests in the land including numerous cultural and spiritual holdings. The monument was later established.

Friday, May 18, 2012

During this week in 1942, more than 250 Aboriginal people were removed from their homes at the Cape Bedford Lutheran mission near Cooktown in Queensland, Australia. The Guugu Yimidhirr people were accused of siding with the Japanese during World War II. They were sent to different sites where more than two dozen people died of illness and the cold within the first month. Nearly a year later, sixty people died while in captivity. Survivors returned home in 1949.

 

Thursday, May 17, 2012

On this day in 1858, Northwest tribes defeated U.S. troops in the Battle of Pine Creek, also known as the Steptoe Battle. The conflict took place near present day Rosalia, Washington.

 

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

On this day in 2009, the Choctaw Nation in Oklahoma commemorated the Choctaw Trail of Tears with a four-mile walk. Choctaw people were removed from their homelands and forced to walk the Trail of Tears from 1831 to 1833. The removal of Choctaw people from Mississippi to what?s now southern Oklahoma began, after the signing of a U.S. treaty. The Choctaw Nation holds commemorative walks annually from various locations along the historic trail.

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

On this day in 1978, the Peoria Tribe of Indians in Oklahoma was reinstated by the U.S. Government as a federally recognized tribe. The tribe lost federal recognition under the U.S. Termination Policy of 1959. The Peoria Tribe is headquartered in Miami, Oklahoma and has about three thousand enrolled members. The tribe elected its first woman chief in 2000.

Monday, May 14, 2012

On this day in 2009, the State of Oregon held Tribal Information Day. The event was renamed Tribal Government Day in recognition of the government-to-government relationship between the nine tribes and the state. This year's event was held on Friday at the State Capitol building in Salem.

Friday, May 11, 2012

During this week in 2011, the Oneida Indian Nation donated one million dollars to the National Museum of the American Indian. The New York tribe has donated at least twenty million to the museum. The fourth floor of the museum in Washington, D.C. is named after the Oneida Indian Nation's philanthropic success.

Thursday, May 10, 2012

During this week in 2009, the U.S. Senate confirmed Dr. Yvette Roubideaux as director of the Indian Health Service. The Rosebud Sioux tribal member is the first woman director of the IHS, which serves nearly two million American Indian and Alaska Native people.

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

On this day in 1951, internationally renowned Muskogee Creek poet, writer, and musician, Joy Harjo was born. Her books include "The Woman Who Fell From the Sky," and "For A Girl Becoming." Harjo's musical compositions include "Winding Through the Milky Way" - for which she received Best Female Artist at the 11th Annual Native American Music Awards. Harjo was named film script 2005 Writer of the Year for "A Thousand Roads" and is scheduled to release a memoir entitled "Crazy Brave" this summer.

Tuesday, May 8, 2012

On this day in 1936, Clyde Bellecourt was born on the White Earth reservation in Minnesota. Bellecourt helped form the American Indian Movement in the 1960s.

Monday, May 7, 2012

On this day in 2009, the Gathering of Native American Graduates was held in Houma, Louisiana, to recognize high school graduates. More than two dozen students participated in the ceremony that honored education and Native American heritage and culture.

Friday, May 4, 2012

During this month in 1923, the first 14-cent stamp was issued in the United States and featured an American Indian. The stamp was inspired by a photo of Brule Sioux leader Hollow Horn Bear. The photograph was taken in 1905 when the chief was in Washington, D.C. for the inauguration of President Theodore Roosevelt.

Thursday, May 3, 2012

During this week in 1887, Cherokee Council member Ned Christie was falsely accused of murdering a U.S. Marshal. Christie was never convicted in court for any crime. He was assassinated after a five-year standoff with the federal government. Several witnesses came forward clearing Christie of any wrongdoing and he became a symbol of tribal sovereignty. Christie opposed railroad development through Indian Territory which some believe may have contributed to his troubles.

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

On this day in 1929, Link Wray was born. He pioneered a distorted electric guitar sound, the power cord technique. Wray was proud of his Shawnee heritage and named some songs after tribes. He passed away in 2005. Wray was inducted into the Native American Music Hall of Fame and was named one of the top 100 guitarists of all time by Rolling Stone Magazine.

Tuesday, May 1, 2012

During this month in 2007, Virginia tribal leaders met Queen Elizabeth during the commemoration of Jamestown's 400th Anniversary. The queen mentioned Native Americans during her address at the State Capitol, but she didn't apologize for the impacts the English settlement had on Native people. Many Native people felt that it would have been an opportunity for her to issue an apology.

Monday, April 30, 2012

On this day in 1939, Dr. Alfonso Ortiz from Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo was born. Ortiz was raised by his grandparents who taught him the importance of his Native language and culture. Ortiz earned a PhD in anthropology from the University of Chicago. His work includes the book "The Tewa World: Space, Time, Being and Becoming in a Pueblo Society." He was an advocate for Native American rights, education, and religious freedom. The Alfonso Ortiz Center for Intercultural Studies at the University of New Mexico was named in his honor in 2000, three years after his death.

Friday, April 27, 2012

On this day in 2011, Yupik professor, anthropologist, and actor Dr. Oscar Kawagley died. He was well known for his writings on "Indigenous methodology" and his appearances in television and film.

Thursday, April 26, 2012

On this day in 1936, Kootenai tribal leader Amelia Trice was born in Idaho. She led the Kootenai Tribe in a non-violent war against the U.S. in 1974. Members demonstrated and set up tollbooths along a U.S. highway. The actions prompted the government to allocate more than 12 acres to the tribe and make improvements in housing and health care. Trice died in 2011 after battling cancer.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

On this day in 1914, Army Sergeant John Raymond Rice was born. The Ho-Chunk man was killed in action during the Korean War. Prior to joining the Army, Rice had served as a Marine during World War II. A national controversy sparked after a local cemetery in Sioux City, Iowa ordered that Rice's body be disinterred after park officials and city leaders found out he was Native American. President Truman ordered that Rice be buried between two generals at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. He was buried with full honors almost a year after his death.

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

On this day in 2007, Amnesty International released a report entitled the Maze of Injustice: The failure to protect Indigenous women from sexual violence in the USA. According to the report, Justice Department statistics show Native American and Alaskan Native women are 2.5 times more likely to be raped or sexually assaulted. The report also showed that 86 percent of the crimes perpetrated against Indigenous women were by non-Native men.

Monday, April 23, 2012

On this day in 2007, the Poarch Band of Creek Indians in southeastern, Alabama, announced it would donate $25,000 to the City of Enterprise for its tornado fund. The gesture was in response to a tornado that hit the city on March 1st, 2007. Eight teenagers and one elder died in the tornado. The tribe has a fund to help schools, scholarships, senior citizen centers, youth clubs, and other charities in the state.

Friday, April 20, 2012

During this month in 2009, the Indigenous Peoples' Global Summit on Climate Change was held in Anchorage, Alaska. The five-day event included the drafting of a declaration detailing how countries and Indigenous people could work together to address climate change.

Thursday, April 19, 2012

On this day in 1907, Onondaga long distance runner Tom Longboat won the Boston Marathon in a record time of two hours, 24 minutes and 24 seconds. Longboat was born on the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada. He was considered Canada's greatest runner. Longboat was inducted in the Canadian Indian Hall of Fame and the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

During this month in 1974, the song "Come And Get Your Love" by the Native American rock band - Redbone - was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America. The band was formed by Yaqui and Shoshone brothers Lolly and Pat Vegas. Redbone had an earlier hit with the song "Witch Queen of New Orleans" that topped the charts in 1972. The band was inducted into the Native American Music Awards Hall of Fame in 2008.

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

During this month in 2011, Marjorie Tahbone was named Miss Indian World at the Gathering of Nations Pow Wow in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Tahbone, Inupiaq and Kiowa, was raised in Nome, Alaska. She also held the title of Miss World Eskimo Indian Olympics. The new Miss Indian World will be crowned April 28th.

Monday, April 16, 2012

On this day in 1946, musician R. Carlos Nakai was born in Flagstaff, Arizona. The Navajo and Ute man has been nominated for four Grammy Awards. His flute albums: Canyon Trilogy and Earth Spirit have been certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America. Nakai was inducted into the Arizona Music and Entertainment Hall of Fame in 2005.

Friday, April 13, 2012

On this day in 2011, California?s Yurok Tribe purchased more than 20,000 acres of ancestral land from the Green Diamond Resource Company in Humboldt County. The tribe plans to open up the Yurok Tribal Community Forest to monitor and improve water quality and to restore meadowlands to help sustain hunting and gathering. A future plan includes the purchase of an additional 25,000 acres.

Thursday, April 12, 2012

On this day in 1937, actor and activist Dennis Banks was born on the Leech Lake reservation in Minnesota. Banks is a co-founder of the American Indian Movement in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He?s organized and lead walks across the nation to address Native American issues like the epidemic of diabetes in Indian Country. A 75th birthday celebration with activist Russell Means and comedian Charlie Hill is taking place Friday at Leech Lake.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

On this day in 1968, the Indian Civil Rights Act was enacted. The act was created as a means to ensure the civil rights of Native Americans living on reservation lands. The U.S. Constitution did not provide such freedoms and rights for Indians prior to the signing of the act by President Johnson. The act was amended in later years.

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

During this month in 2011, the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations and the Metis Nation of Saskatchewan initiated a voting drive to urge members of Canada's First Nations to vote. The campaign's goal was to increase the number of Indigenous votes and to inform members of the electoral process and issues they would be voting on.

Monday, April 9, 2012

On this day in 2011, elderly women from four tribes began walking from Olympia, Washington to meet other walkers for the Mother Earth Water Walk. The first walk was held in 2003 around Lake Superior to raise awareness about water issues. A 2012 water walk is scheduled to begin later this month in Ontario, Canada.

Friday, April 6, 2012

On this day in 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against the Navajo tribe in the case United States vs Navajo Nation. The tribe filed a lawsuit claiming that the Federal Government had acted in the best interest of a coal mining company instead of the tribe when the rate of royalty payments were decided. The tribe has long sought damages it says it's owed.

Thursday, April 5, 2012

On this day in 2001, the New York State Education Department called on school boards in the state to end the use of Indian mascots. The measure was an effort to help remove negative perceptions about Native Americans from schools. The U.S. Civil Rights Commission followed suit eight days later calling for an end to the use of Native American logos, mascots, and nicknames by non-Native schools and universities. Several schools in New York retired their Indian mascots.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

On this day in 1989, artist Woodrow "Woody" Crumbo passed away. The Potawatomi man is best known for his American Indian Dancer series of paintings. He worked with silkscreens, etchings, drawings, and jewelry. His work has been displayed across the U.S. including at the San Francisco Museum of Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

On this day in 1987, the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma made an agreement with the Sac and Fox Tribe of Oklahoma to proceed over Kickapoo hearings. The agreement was made between the two tribes to oversee cases involving civil, criminal, juvenile, and appellate hearings. The Kickapoo Tribe adopted its own court system in 1991.

Monday, April 2, 2012

During this week in 2009, the Australian government adopted the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Then-Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said it was an effort to ?reset? relations between white Australians and Aborigines. Australia voted against the declaration with the U.S. and Canada when it was first adopted by the General Assembly.

Friday, March 30, 2012

On this day in 1960, national football midfielder, Shane Rufer was born in New Zealand. His mother is Maori and his father is Swiss. Rufer?s soccer career from the late 1970s to early 90s included playing for New Zealand and for Swiss clubs. Rufer and his brother now help with youth football initiatives in New Zealand. He?s Director and General Manager of the Shane Rufer School of Football.

Thursday, March 29, 2012

On this day in 1902, Choctaw author Todd Downing was born. He?s considered to be "Oklahoma's first successful writer of detective novels," according to the Oklahoma Historical Society. Downing's books include "Murder On Tour," "The Cat Screams," and "Night Over Mexico." He also wrote an introduction to Choctaw grammar, which was published by the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1971 for a Choctaw bilingual education program.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

On this day in 1953, Olympic champion and great all-around athlete Jim Thorpe passed away. The Sac and Fox man was acclaimed by his peers and a king as the world?s greatest athlete of his time. Besides excelling in track and field, he also played professional baseball and football.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

On this day in 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court decided in favor of Ruth McClanahan, a member of the Navajo Nation in the case McClanahan vs. Arizona State Tax Commission. Based on tribal sovereignty, the ruling declared that the State of Arizona had no jurisdiction to tax income derived wholly from Navajo reservation sources.

Monday, March 26, 2012

On this day in 1933, author, lawyer and champion of American Indian rights Vine Deloria, Jr., was born. He was well known for his book "Custer Died For Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto."

Friday, March 23, 2012

On this day in 1889, President Harrison signed a proclamation to open land for settlement in Indian Territory in Oklahoma.

Thursday, March 22, 2012

On this day in 1837, U.S. Brigadier General John E. Wool addressed Cherokee people at New Echota, Georgia. Wool advised them they had until May 25, 1838 to move to land set aside for them west of the Mississippi, under terms of a treaty. He said if they did not move, they would be forcibly removed by U.S. soldiers. Wool eventually resigned and was replaced by General Winfield Scott who began the removal of Cherokees from their homelands.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

During this month in 1617, Pocahontas was buried in England after dying from an unknown illness. She was the daughter of Powhatan, the leader of tribes in present-day Virginia. She was about 10-years-old when English captive John Smith was brought to her father. Stories and opinions differ on whether she actually saved Smith from execution and became his lover. Pocahontas later married English tobacco planter John Rolfe and took the name Rebecca. In 2006, a delegation of Virginia Indians visited her gravesite in England and honored her as one of their ancestors who faced difficult decisions and did her best for her people.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

During this week in 2007, the first National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day was observed in the United States. It?s an opportunity for Native people and tribes to learn about HIV and AIDS. Health care agencies encourage HIV testing and prevention.

Monday, March 19, 2012

On this day in 1900, an executive order increased the size of the Tongue River Indian Reservation in Montana. It was renamed the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation. Today nearly five thousand enrolled Northern Cheyenne tribal members live on the reservation, located in the southeastern part of the state.

Friday, March 16, 2012

On this day in 2011, Navajo Code Talker Lloyd Oliver passed away. The 88-year-old was from Shiprock, New Mexico. He joined the Marines in 1942 and was one of the original 29 Navajo men who created an unbreakable code in their traditional language. The code was used to transmit messages in the Pacific during World War II.

Thursday, March 15, 2012

On this day in 1978, Congress returned Zuni Salt Lake to Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico. It's considered the home of Ma'l Okyattsik'i, the Zuni Salt Mother deity. The lake has also been used by the pueblos of Acoma, Laguna, Hopi, Taos, and by the Navajo and Apache tribes. The salt is used as seasoning and for ceremonial purposes. 

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

On this day in 1912, Judson Lawrence Brown was born in Kluckwan, a small Tlingit village 40 miles from Haines, Alaska. He was the first Native person to attend an integrated school in Alaska. Brown was the first Alaska Native to serve as mayor of Haines and served two terms.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

On this day in 1864, the first group of Navajo people arrived at Fort Sumner in New Mexico. The U.S. forced them to walk to the fort from their traditional homelands more than 300 miles away. Known as the Long Walk, many people died along the way. Navajo people were allowed to return home after the signing of a treaty in 1868.

Monday, March 12, 2012

During this month in 2011, an honoring ceremony was held for the first South Dakota Secretary of Tribal Relations Leroy LaPlante. The Cheyenne River Sioux tribal member was named to the post to foster a better working relationship with the state and nine tribes within its borders. South Dakota Governor Dennis Daugaard created the cabinet-level position after taking office last year.

Friday, March 9, 2012

On this day in 1959, actor Rodney Grant was born. Grant was raised by his grandparents on the Omaha Reservation in Nebraska. He is best known for his role in "Dances with Wolves" as Wind In His Hair. Grant was chosen as one of the 50 Most Beautiful People In the World by People Magazine in 1991.

Thursday, March 8, 2012

On this day in 1970, members of the United Nations of All Tribes occupied Fort Lawton in Washington. The base was scheduled to be turned into a park by city leaders. The takeover happened after unsuccessful tries to persuade city and federal officials to return the land to Native people. A cultural and social services center was later built at the site to help urban Indians in the Seattle area.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

During this week 1978, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled tribal courts do not have inherent criminal jurisdiction to try and punish non-Indians and need Congressional authorization to do so. The case involved the Suquamish Tribe and a non-Native. Mark Oliphant was arrested during the tribe?s Chief Seattle Days on the Port Madison reservation in Washington. He was charged with assaulting a tribal officer and resisting arrest. He claimed he was not subject to tribal authority.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

During this week in 2009, Carrie Dann, a member of the Western Shoshone tribe, and Manny Pino, a member of Acoma Pueblo, were recognized for their work to protect sacred areas. Dann and Pino received the Human Rights Defenders award by the International Indian Treaty Council. They were honored during the Indigenous Peoples Struggles to Defend Sacred Places symposium held at San Francisco State University.

Monday, March 5, 2012

On this day in 1980, Jay Silverheels who played Tonto in the television series "The Lone Ranger" passed away in Los Angeles, California. Silverheels was a member of the Six Nations Tribe of the Grand River Reserve in Canada. He was 67-years-old.

Friday, March 2, 2012

During this week in 2011, Jason Campbell an inmate at the Ohio State Penitentiary began a hunger strike to fight for the religious rights of incarcerated Native Americans. Campbell was segregated after refusing his ninth meal and a religious necklace he had was confiscated. Campbell advocated for the right to have tobacco, sacred objects for medicine bundles, feathers, and moccasins in order to practice his religious beliefs. He gained approval of some items. The hunger strike lasted about 12 days.

Thursday, March 1, 2012

On this day in 1973, 19-year-old Larry Casuse, a Navajo Engineering student at the University of New Mexico brought national attention to the border town of Gallup, New Mexico. Casuse held Mayor Emmett "Frankie" Garcia hostage in a downtown store in an attempt to showcase the exploitation of Native Americans by city leaders and local businesses. He was also protesting Garcia?s appointment to UNM?s Board of Regents. The mayor owned several bars in the area while holding a position as chairman of an alcohol abuse rehabilitation committee. Garcia escaped through a window in the store and Casuse was surrounded by police and shot to death.

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

On this day in 1916, Cherokee sculptor Willard Stone was born. His creations were primarily in wood. The Cherokee Nation adopted one of his pieces entitled "Exodus" as its logo. A large collection of his work is housed at the Willard Stone Museum in Locust Grove, Oklahoma.

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

On this day in 1973, Oglala Lakota and American Indian Movement members occupied the Wounded Knee site on the Pine Ridge reservation.  The occupiers wanted to draw attention to the mistreatment of Native Americans by the U.S. government.  The siege lasted more than two months.

Monday, February 27, 2012

During this month in 1875, Kiowa Chief Lone Wolf surrendered to the U.S. Army at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Lone Wolf was a leader during the resistance to reservation life.

Friday, February 24, 2012

On this day in 1835, the first issue of the Shawnee Sun was published. The newspaper is considered to be the first periodical published in Kansas - as well as the first Native American paper printed entirely in a Native American language. An 1841 copy is considered to be the only surviving copy preserved at the University of Missouri-Kansas. The original is believed to be in the possession of a Kansas City family. The Shawnee Sun was printed at the Shawnee Indian Mission and circulated for nearly a decade.

Thursday, February 23, 2012

During this month in 1893, the Campo Indian Reservation near San Diego was established for the Campo band of Kumeyaay Indians. The tribe was given one acre of land. Today, the tribe is in the process of developing a 160-megawatt wind farm. The tribe says it will be the first tribe in the nation with a commercial wind farm on its reservation.

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

On this day in 1855, the Pillager and Mississippi Ojibwe bands signed a treaty with the United States. Ojibwe bands were living throughout northern Minnesota when the first settlers arrived. Treaties were negotiated to acquire land in exchange for cash and goods. The Leech Lake Indian Reservation was established for the two bands in north-central Minnesota.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

On this day in 1828, the first edition of the Cherokee Phoenix was printed in Georgia. It was the first tribal and bilingual newspaper published in the United States.

Monday, February 20, 2012

On this day in 2009, what?s believed to the first memorial dedicated to Australian Indigenous war veterans in an Aboriginal community was unveiled in Toomelah, New South Wales. The memorial features a plaque listing the names of 21 Aboriginal veterans who served in both World Wars and the Vietnam War.

Friday, February 17, 2012

On this day in 2009, on the centennial of Geronimo?s death, his great-grandson and other descendants filed a lawsuit in federal court against Yale University, the secretive student society Skull and Bones and the federal government. The suit alleged the Apache leader?s remains were stolen by members of the society in 1918 from Geronimo?s grave in Oklahoma and taken to Connecticut. The descendants wanted to rebury the remains in New Mexico. The lawsuit was dismissed in 2010.

Thursday, February 16, 2012

On this day in 1863, Congress passed an act to abolish treaties made between the United States and Dakota bands living along the Mississippi River. The act was a response to uprisings between the bands and settlers. The act took away their lands in Minnesota.

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

On this day in 1831, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution asking President Jackson if he was going to live up to the Indian Trade and Intercourse Act passed in 1802. The acts regulated travel and commerce on Indian lands and established trading posts to help tribes but were instead used as leverage by the government to obtain more.

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

On this day in 1894, Joseph Nicolar died. The Penobscot man?s book "The Life and Traditions of the Red Man" was considered to be a literary masterpiece.

Monday, February 13, 2012

On this day in 1998, the Colorado River Native Nations Alliance and their allies began a spiritual occupation of Ward Valley, California.  The federal government planned to close the area to test for tritium at the site of a proposed radioactive waste dump.  Tribes said testing would desecrate the site held sacred to them.

Friday, February 10, 2012

On this day in 1992, Jim Pepper died of lymphoma. The Creek-Kaw jazz saxophonist primarily played the tenor sax and was considered one of the pioneers of fusion jazz. Pepper also blended in songs taught to him by his grandfather and father.

Thursday, February 9, 2012

During this week in 2009, eight Latin American countries held discussion in Panama on Indigenous issues and climate change. The findings were given to a United Nations advisory committee.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

During this month in 2006, the first meeting of the Native American Caucus of the Oklahoma House of Representatives took place.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

During this month in 2007, two prominent Native Americans passed away less than a week apart, filmmaker Phil Lucas and composer Louis Ballard. Both men were known throughout the Indigenous art circle.

Monday, February 6, 2012

During this month in 1879, hundreds of Paiute people arrived on the Yakama reservation in Washington after being forcibly marched from Oregon by the U.S. Army. The event is known as the Paiute Trail of Tears.

Friday, February 3, 2012

During this week in 2007, then-13-year-old Akina Shirt made history at a National Hockey League game in Canada. She became the first person to sing "O Canada" in the Cree language at a NHL game. Shirt first started singing the anthem at Saddle Lake First Nation games.

Thursday, February 2, 2012

During this week in 2011, thousands of Canadians became eligible to receive Indian status after a change in legislation. Descendants denied status because their grandmothers married non-Indians became eligible.

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

During this month in 1885, the Lumbee were recognized as an Indian tribe by North Carolina. The tribe has been working to gain full federal recognition for more than a century.



Tuesday, January 31, 2012

During this week in 1917, the reservation for the Tohono O?odham people was established. Today, the tribe?s four land bases are comparable in size to the state of Connecticut.

Monday, January 30, 2012

During this week in 2010, Las Vegas entertainer Wayne Newton testified in support of state recognition for his tribe, the Patawomeck Indians of Virginia. The measure passed two weeks later.

Friday, January 27, 2012

During this month in 1830, famed orator and Seneca Chief, Red Jacket died. Red Jacket took his name after a highly favored embroidered coat given to him by the British.

Thursday, January 26, 2012

On this day annually, Aboriginal Australians recognize Survival Day when the first British fleet arrived in the country in 1788.  The lives of Aboriginal people were changed by the English settlement and government policies like the forced removal of Aboriginal children from their homes, known as the “Stolen Generations.

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

On this day in 2010, the U.S. Mint launched the 2010 Native American $1 coin with a design honoring the Iroquois Confederacy.

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

During this week in 2009, the State-Tribal Collaboration Act was introduced in the New Mexico legislature to improve the government-to-government relationship with the state's 22 tribes. It included appointing a tribal liaison to every cabinet level agency and requiring the governor to hold an annual summit with tribes. The bill was signed into law less than two months later.

Monday, January 23, 2012

During this week in 2010, Alaska Native people in Noorvik were the first to be counted for the U.S. Census. The Census Bureau began the 2010 count in rural Alaska villages, not linked by roads, in January and February while the ground was still frozen so villagers could be reached by snow machine or dogsled.

Friday, January 20, 2012

During this week in 2008, the last traditional speaker of the Eyak language died, Honorary Chief Marie Smith Jones. A website was launched last year to help Eyak people of Cordova, Alaska learn the language.

Thursday, January 19, 2012

During this week 1958, Lumbee tribal members broke up a Ku Klux Klan rally, pushing them out of a North Carolina county.

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

During this week in 2008, the Turtle Mountain State Bank held a grand opening event on the Turtle Mountain reservation in North Dakota. It?s the first privately owned Native American bank on a reservation.

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

During this week in 1974, according to a report from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Menominee Tribe officially resumed receiving federal services. The tribe?s federal recognition status had been terminated more than a decade earlier.

Monday, January 16, 2012

During this month in 1907, Charles Curtis became the first Native American to serve in the U.S. Senate. The Republican from Kansas was a member of the Kaw Nation of Oklahoma.

Friday, January 13, 2012

During this week in 2010, All-American Rhodes Scholar Myron Rolle kicked off the ?Our Way to Health Program? at a Bureau of Indian Education School in New Mexico. Five BIE schools were chosen to participate to address childhood obesity and diabetes.

Thursday, January 12, 2012

On this day in 1923, Ira Hayes was born in Arizona. The Native American became famous after he helped raise the U.S. flag on Iwo Jima during World War II.

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

On this day in 2011, Ben Shelly was sworn in as President of the Navajo Nation. He previously served as vice-president and council delegate.

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

During this month in 2011, a new website was launched to help people learn the Eyak language through weekly words and help from linguistic experts. The last fluent speaker of the language of the Eyak people of Cordova, Alaska died in 2008.

Monday, January 09, 2012

During this month in 1969, Navajo Community College opened its doors as the first tribally established and operated institution in the United States. Known today as Dine College, the school has several campuses throughout the Navajo Nation.

Friday, January 06, 2012

During this week in 1975, the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act was signed into law to give tribes authority over federal programs.

Thursday, January 05, 2012

On this day in 1987, National Native News signed on the air in Anchorage, Alaska. It was the first nationally syndicated daily radio newscast to focus on the Native angle in every story. The show is produced today in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by Koahnic Broadcast Corporation. It?s heard on tribal and public radio stations across the United States and Canada.

Wednesday, January 04, 2012

During this week in 2010, Stacy Phelps, a 1996 mechanical engineering graduate, was the recipient of a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring. Phelps of the Oglala Lakota College received the award during a ceremony held on January 6th at the White House.

Tuesday, January 03, 2012

On this day in 2001, nominations for the 43rd Grammy Awards were announced including the debut of the Best Native American Music Album category. The first Grammy in this category went to the Gathering of Nations Pow Wow later that year.


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